Team-based approach to improving medication reconciliation rates in family medicine residency clinics

Peter G. Harper, Katherine Montag Schafer, Kristi Van Riper, Kathryn Justesen, Timothy Ramer, Cherilyn Wicks, Abayomi Oyenuga, Jennifer Budd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this quality improvement project was to design and implement a systematic team-based care approach to medication reconciliation, with a goal of physician-documented medication reconciliation at 70% of all patient office visits.

SETTING: Ambulatory clinics located in urban, underserved communities in Minneapolis and St. Paul, MN.

PRACTICE DESCRIPTION: Four family medicine residency clinics, with pharmacists integrated at each site. All clinics use the Epic electronic medical record (Epic Systems Corporation).

PRACTICE INNOVATION: A team-based care approach to medication reconciliation was designed and implemented involving medical assistants (MAs), physicians, and pharmacists. The MAs did an initial review with patients, the physicians addressed discrepancies, and difficult situations were escalated to the pharmacist for a detailed assessment.

EVALUATION: The percentage of visits with physician-documented medication reconciliation was measured preintervention and then for 18 months postintervention in 6-month intervals involving more than 118,000 patient visits. Satisfaction surveys of team members were done pre- and postintervention.

RESULTS: The percentage of visits with physician-documented medication reconciliation improved significantly from 6.5% preintervention to 58.7% (P < 0.001) postintervention, and was sustained and further improved to 70.3% (P < 0.001) 1 year later. The team members had a statistically significant improvement in their ability to articulate the medication reconciliation process. Satisfaction improved significantly for physicians, but MAs did not experience a statistically significant change.

CONCLUSION: A team-based care approach to medication reconciliation was successfully implemented and sustained at 4 family medicine clinics. There was significant improvement in physician-documented medication reconciliation. Future studies need to address whether this process improves medication-list discrepancies, completeness, and accuracy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e46-e52
JournalJournal of the American Pharmacists Association
Volume61
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 14 2020

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