Teaching tobacco dependence treatment and counseling skills during medical school: Rationale and design of the Medical Students helping patients Quit tobacco (MSQuit) group randomized controlled trial

Rashelle B. Hayes, Alan Geller, Linda Churchill, Denise Jolicoeur, David M. Murray, Abigail Shoben, Sean P. David, Michael Adams, Kola Okuyemi, Randy Fauver, Robin Gross, Frank Leone, Rui Xiao, Jonathan Waugh, Sybil Crawford, Judith K. Ockene

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Physician-delivered tobacco treatment using the 5As is clinically recommended, yet its use has been limited. Lack of adequate training and confidence to provide tobacco treatment is cited as leading reasons for limited 5A use. Tobacco dependence treatment training while in medical school is recommended, but is minimally provided. The MSQuit trial (Medical Students helping patients Quit tobacco) aims to determine if a multi-modal and theoretically-guided tobacco educational intervention will improve tobacco dependence treatment skills (i.e. 5As) among medical students. Methods/design: 10 U.S. medical schools were pair-matched and randomized in a group-randomized controlled trial to evaluate whether a multi-modal educational (MME) intervention compared to traditional education (TE) will improve observed tobacco treatment skills. MME is primarily composed of TE approaches (i.e. didactics) plus a 1st year web-based course and preceptor-facilitated training during a 3rd year clerkship rotation. The primary outcome measure is an objective score on an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) tobacco-counseling smoking case among 3rd year medical students from schools who implemented the MME or TE. Discussion: MSQuit is the first randomized to evaluate whether a tobacco treatment educational intervention implemented during medical school will improve medical students' tobacco treatment skills. We hypothesize that the MME intervention will better prepare students in tobacco dependence treatment as measured by the OSCE. If a comprehensive tobacco treatment educational learning approach is effective, while also feasible and acceptable to implement, then medical schools may substantially influence skill development and use of the 5As among future physicians.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)284-293
Number of pages10
JournalContemporary Clinical Trials
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2014

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the NIH/NCI research grant 5R01 CA 136888 and 5R01CA136888S to Judith K. Ockene & Rashelle B. Hayes respectively. We also acknowledge all school site PIs, research coordinators, academic detailers, research assistants, support staff, as well as the participating medical students and preceptors who have implemented and participated in the study thus far.

Keywords

  • 5As
  • Group randomized controlled trial
  • Medical school education
  • Medical students
  • Tobacco control
  • Tobacco dependence treatment and counseling

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