Teaching high-value care: A novel morning report

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Despite rising health care costs and calls for the incorporation of high-value care (HVC) into medical training, there are few described curricula to address this need. Methods: We designed a single-group pre/post comparison to evaluate the impact of a 45-minute HVC morning report in one academic internal medicine programme on the trainees' self-reported knowledge of costs for common diagnostic tests, impact on future ordering practices and the educational value of the intervention. Medical trainees completed a diagnostic evaluation for a hypothetical case within the constraints of a budget during the morning report. Trainees completed a pre/post intervention survey regarding knowledge and attitudes towards HVC, and an evaluation of the intervention. The Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to determine differences between the pre/post intervention survey responses. There are few described curricula to address the need for the incorporation of high-value care into medical training Results: Fifty-eight trainees participated in the educational activity: 57 completed the survey and 54 completed the evaluation. Our results indicate a significant increase following the morning report intervention in: the trainees' self-reported understanding of the cost for diagnostic tests (p < 0.001); the likelihood the cost of diagnostic tests would affect their future ordering practices (p < 0.001); and the likelihood that the cost of diagnostic tests would affect their timing of a diagnostic evaluation (p ≤ 0.001). The results also indicated a significant decrease in the likelihood that trainees would order extra diagnostic evaluations following the intervention (p = 0.015), and 96 per cent felt that the session was educationally valuable. Discussion: A morning report incorporating cost of care can significantly increase trainees' perceived understanding of cost and affect self-reported ordering practices in an educationally valuable intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)165-170
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Teacher
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Teaching Rounds
Teaching
Routine Diagnostic Tests
Costs and Cost Analysis
Curriculum
Budgets
Internal Medicine
Nonparametric Statistics
Health Care Costs
Education
Surveys and Questionnaires

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Teaching high-value care : A novel morning report. / Bowman Peterson, Jill M; Duran, Alisa M; Duffy, Briar L; Gladding, Sophia P; Baum, Karyn D.

In: Clinical Teacher, Vol. 12, No. 3, 01.01.2015, p. 165-170.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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