Teaching children with severe disabilities to utilize nonobligatory conversational opportunities: An application of high-probability requests

Carol A. Davis, Joe Reichle, Kristin Southard, Susan Johnston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two children with severe disabilities who used electronic communication aids were taught to extend conversations as a result of implementation of an intervention strategy based on high-probability request sequences. Both participants had been selected as a result of the discrepancy between their propensity to respond to obligatory conversational bids (e.g., a question such as "What did you do at recess?") and their propensity to refrain from responding to nonobligatory conversational bids (e.g., comments such as "I played kickball at recess"). Both learners' conversational maintenance skills improved as a result of the procedure. Educational implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)57-68
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of the Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps
Volume23
Issue number1
StatePublished - Mar 1 1998

Keywords

  • Language
  • Motor impairments
  • Nonvocal communication
  • Peer tutoring
  • Special education

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Teaching children with severe disabilities to utilize nonobligatory conversational opportunities: An application of high-probability requests'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this