Targeting mitochondria for treatment of chemoresistant ovarian cancer

Edith Emmings, Sally A Mullany, Zenas Chang, Charles N. Landen, Stig Linder, Martina Bazzaro

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy in the Western world. This is due, in part, to the fact that despite standard treatment of surgery and platinum/paclitaxel most patients recur with ultimately chemoresistant disease. Ovarian cancer is a unique form of solid tumor that develops, metastasizes and recurs in the same space, the abdominal cavity, which becomes a unique microenvironment characterized by ascites, hypoxia and low glucose levels. It is under these conditions that cancer cells adapt and switch to mitochondrial respiration, which becomes crucial to their survival, and therefore an ideal metabolic target for chemoresistant ovarian cancer. Importantly, independent of microenvironmental factors, mitochondria spatial redistribution has been associated to both tumor metastasis and chemoresistance in ovarian cancer while specific sets of genetic mutations have been shown to cause aberrant dependence on mitochondrial pathways in the most aggressive ovarian cancer subtypes. In this review we summarize on targeting mitochondria for treatment of chemoresistant ovarian cancer and current state of understanding of the role of mitochondria respiration in ovarian cancer. We feel this is an important and timely topic given that ovarian cancer remains the deadliest of the gynecological diseases, and that the mitochondrial pathway has recently emerged as critical in sustaining solid tumor progression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number229
JournalInternational journal of molecular sciences
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Funding: This work was supported by Department of Defense Ovarian Cancer Research Program Grant OC160377, the Minnesota Ovarian Cancer Alliance and the Randy Shaver Cancer Research Funds to Martina Bazzaro.

Funding Information:
This work was supported by Department of Defense Ovarian Cancer Research Program Grant OC160377, the Minnesota Ovarian Cancer Alliance and the Randy Shaver Cancer Research Funds to Martina Bazzaro.

Keywords

  • Ascites
  • Chemoresistant ovarian cancer
  • Mitochondrial inhibitor
  • OXPHOS
  • SWI/SNF complex

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