Taking an educational psychology course improves neuroscience literacy but does not reduce belief in neuromyths

Soo hyun Im, Joo Yun Cho, Janet M. Dubinsky, Sashank Varma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Educators are increasingly interested in applying neuroscience findings to improve educational practice. However, their understanding of the brain often lags behind their enthusiasm for the brain. We propose that educational psychology can serve as a bridge between basic research in neuroscience and psychology on one hand and educational practice on the other. We evaluated whether taking an educational psychology course is associated with increased neuroscience literacy and reduced belief in neuromyths in a sample of South Korean pre-service teachers. The results showed that taking an educational psychology course was associated with the increased neuroscience literacy, but there was no impact on belief in neuromyths. We consider the implications of these and other findings of the study for redesigning educational psychology courses and textbooks for improving neuroscience literacy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0192163
JournalPloS one
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2018

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