Symptoms of Anxiety and Depression in Relation to Work Patterns During the First Wave of the COVID-19 Epidemic in Philadelphia PA A Cross-Sectional Survey

Igor Burstyn, Tran Huynh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: We investigated whether patterns of work during COVID-19 pandemic altered by effort to contain the outbreak affected anxiety and depression. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional online survey of 911 residents of Philadelphia, inquiring about their working lives during early months of the epidemic, symptoms of anxiety and depression, plus demographics, perceived sources of support, and general health. Results: Occupational contact with suspected COVID-19 cases was associated with anxiety. Concerns about return to work, childcare, lack of sick leave, and loss/reduction in work correlated with anxiety and depression, even when there was no evidence of occupational contact with infected persons; patterns differed by sex. Conclusions: Heightened anxiety and depression during COVID-19 pandemic can be due to widespread disruption of working lives, especially in ‘‘non-essential’’ low-income industries, on par with experience in healthcare.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E283-E293
JournalJournal of occupational and environmental medicine
Volume63
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2021
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
Copyright © 2021 American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

Keywords

  • coronavirus
  • disaster preparedness
  • epidemiology
  • gender differences
  • mood disorders
  • pandemic
  • stay-at-home orders
  • unemployment

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