Susceptibility of domestic cats to chronic wasting disease

Candace K. Mathiason, Amy V. Nalls, Davis M. Seelig, Susan L. Kraft, Kevin Carnes, Kelly R. Anderson, Jeanette Hayes-Klug, Edward A. Hoovera

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Domestic and nondomestic cats have been shown to be susceptible to feline spongiform encephalopathy (FSE), almost certainly caused by consumption of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)-contaminated meat. Because domestic and free-ranging nondomestic felids scavenge cervid carcasses, including those in areas affected by chronic wasting disease (CWD), we evaluated the susceptibility of the domestic cat (Felis catus) to CWD infection experimentally. Cohorts of 5 cats each were inoculated intracerebrally (i.c.) or orally (p.o.) with CWD-infected deer brain. At 40 and 42 months postinoculation, two i.c.-inoculated cats developed signs consistent with prion disease, including a stilted gait, weight loss, anorexia, polydipsia, patterned motor behaviors, head and tail tremors, and ataxia, and the cats progressed to terminal disease within 5 months. Brains from these two cats were pooled and inoculated into cohorts of cats by the i.c., p.o., and intraperitoneal and subcutaneous (i.p./s.c.) routes. Upon subpassage, feline CWD was transmitted to all i.c.-inoculated cats with a decreased incubation period of 23 to 27 months. Feline-adapted CWD (FelCWD) was demonstrated in the brains of all of the affected cats by Western blotting and immunohistochemical analysis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed abnormalities in clinically ill cats, which included multifocal T2 fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) signal hyperintensities, ventricular size increases, prominent sulci, and white matter tract cavitation. Currently, 3 of 4 i.p./s.c.-and 2 of 4 p.o. secondary passage-inoculated cats have developed abnormal behavior patterns consistent with the early stage of feline CWD. These results demonstrate that CWD can be transmitted and adapted to the domestic cat, thus raising the issue of potential cervid-to-feline transmission in nature.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1947-1956
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of virology
Volume87
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2013

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Chronic Wasting Disease
chronic wasting disease
Cats
cats
Felidae
prion diseases
Brain
brain
Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
Polydipsia
Prion Diseases
Deer
Disease Susceptibility
Anorexia
Brain Diseases
Tremor
Ataxia

Cite this

Mathiason, C. K., Nalls, A. V., Seelig, D. M., Kraft, S. L., Carnes, K., Anderson, K. R., ... Hoovera, E. A. (2013). Susceptibility of domestic cats to chronic wasting disease. Journal of virology, 87(4), 1947-1956. https://doi.org/10.1128/JVI.02592-12

Susceptibility of domestic cats to chronic wasting disease. / Mathiason, Candace K.; Nalls, Amy V.; Seelig, Davis M.; Kraft, Susan L.; Carnes, Kevin; Anderson, Kelly R.; Hayes-Klug, Jeanette; Hoovera, Edward A.

In: Journal of virology, Vol. 87, No. 4, 01.02.2013, p. 1947-1956.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mathiason, CK, Nalls, AV, Seelig, DM, Kraft, SL, Carnes, K, Anderson, KR, Hayes-Klug, J & Hoovera, EA 2013, 'Susceptibility of domestic cats to chronic wasting disease', Journal of virology, vol. 87, no. 4, pp. 1947-1956. https://doi.org/10.1128/JVI.02592-12
Mathiason CK, Nalls AV, Seelig DM, Kraft SL, Carnes K, Anderson KR et al. Susceptibility of domestic cats to chronic wasting disease. Journal of virology. 2013 Feb 1;87(4):1947-1956. https://doi.org/10.1128/JVI.02592-12
Mathiason, Candace K. ; Nalls, Amy V. ; Seelig, Davis M. ; Kraft, Susan L. ; Carnes, Kevin ; Anderson, Kelly R. ; Hayes-Klug, Jeanette ; Hoovera, Edward A. / Susceptibility of domestic cats to chronic wasting disease. In: Journal of virology. 2013 ; Vol. 87, No. 4. pp. 1947-1956.
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