Survey-related experiential and attitudinal correlates of future health survey participation: Results of a statewide survey

Timothy J. Beebe, Sarah M. Jenkins, Kari J. Anderson, Michael E. Davern

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine the survey-related experiential and attitudinal correlates of future health-related survey participation. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: From July 21, 2005, through October 25, 2005, we conducted a mixed-mode mail and telephone survey of 1636 noninstitutionalized Minnesota residents aged 18 years or older. The overall response rate was 49%. We examined the unadjusted effect of each independent variable on the likelihood of future participation in health-related surveys using univariate logistic regression and discerned the relative contribution of the different variables with multivariate logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Respondents were asked to complete an average of 4.5 different surveys in the year before the current survey; approximately a quarter of the respondents perceived these surveys to be burdensome. The likelihood of future participation in health-related surveys was negatively related to good health status, a busy schedule, and perceptions that the surveys were too long. Respondents were more than twice as likely to indicate that they would participate in a future health-related survey if they knew the organization doing the survey. CONCLUSION: For health-related surveys, investigators should remain mindful of people's busy schedules and keep their surveys as short as possible. Further research is needed to clarify whether the decision to participate in a survey hinges more on knowing the organization paying to have a survey performed (the sponsor) or the survey vendor collecting the data.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1358-1363
Number of pages6
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume83
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2008

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was supported by funds from the Health Sciences Research Small Grants Program, Mayo Clinic.

Copyright:
Copyright 2017 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

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