Survey of Minnesota parent attitudes regarding school-based depression and suicide screening and education

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4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

School-based depression screening and education programs are recommended for addressing the high rates of children's mental illness. The objectives of this study were to (1) identify Minnesota parent attitudes regarding the provision of school-based depression and suicide screening and education and (2) identify predictors of parent support for these school-based programs. A random sample of 1,300 Minnesota households with children ages 5-18 years was surveyed by mail. Chi-square tests and regression analyses were used to detect differences in parent support for depression and suicide screening and education across demographic categories, and parent beliefs and knowledge about depression and suicide. The response rate of eligible households was 43 % (N = 511). Overall, 84-89 % of parents supported school-based depression and suicide screening and education. After adjusting for all variables, parent support for depression screening was associated with greater knowledge [OR 8.48, CI(1.30-55.21)] and fewer stigmatizing beliefs [OR 0.03, CI(0.01-0.12)]. Support for suicide screening was associated with fewer stigmatizing beliefs [OR 0.03, CI(0.01-0.10)]. Support for depression education was associated with fewer stigmatizing beliefs [OR 0.32, CI(0.10-1.00)] and lower educational attainment [OR 0.59, CI(0.40-0.89)]. Support for suicide education was associated with greater knowledge [OR 7.99, CI(1.02-62.68)], fewer stigmatizing beliefs [OR 0.26, CI(0.07-0.92)], and lower educational attainment [OR 0.60, CI(0.38-0.94)]. Parent support for school-based depression and suicide screening and education was high. Parent education to decrease stigmatizing beliefs and increase knowledge about depression and suicide may increase support among the minority of parents who do not endorse such programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)456-462
Number of pages7
JournalMaternal and child health journal
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2013

Fingerprint

Suicide
Depression
Education
Parents
Surveys and Questionnaires
Postal Service
Chi-Square Distribution
Regression Analysis
Demography

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Mass screening
  • Parents
  • School health services
  • Suicide

Cite this

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title = "Survey of Minnesota parent attitudes regarding school-based depression and suicide screening and education",
abstract = "School-based depression screening and education programs are recommended for addressing the high rates of children's mental illness. The objectives of this study were to (1) identify Minnesota parent attitudes regarding the provision of school-based depression and suicide screening and education and (2) identify predictors of parent support for these school-based programs. A random sample of 1,300 Minnesota households with children ages 5-18 years was surveyed by mail. Chi-square tests and regression analyses were used to detect differences in parent support for depression and suicide screening and education across demographic categories, and parent beliefs and knowledge about depression and suicide. The response rate of eligible households was 43 {\%} (N = 511). Overall, 84-89 {\%} of parents supported school-based depression and suicide screening and education. After adjusting for all variables, parent support for depression screening was associated with greater knowledge [OR 8.48, CI(1.30-55.21)] and fewer stigmatizing beliefs [OR 0.03, CI(0.01-0.12)]. Support for suicide screening was associated with fewer stigmatizing beliefs [OR 0.03, CI(0.01-0.10)]. Support for depression education was associated with fewer stigmatizing beliefs [OR 0.32, CI(0.10-1.00)] and lower educational attainment [OR 0.59, CI(0.40-0.89)]. Support for suicide education was associated with greater knowledge [OR 7.99, CI(1.02-62.68)], fewer stigmatizing beliefs [OR 0.26, CI(0.07-0.92)], and lower educational attainment [OR 0.60, CI(0.38-0.94)]. Parent support for school-based depression and suicide screening and education was high. Parent education to decrease stigmatizing beliefs and increase knowledge about depression and suicide may increase support among the minority of parents who do not endorse such programs.",
keywords = "Depression, Mass screening, Parents, School health services, Suicide",
author = "Fox, {Claudia K.} and Eisenberg, {Marla E.} and McMorris, {Barbara J.} and Pettingell, {Sandra L.} and Borowsky, {Iris W.}",
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AU - Fox, Claudia K.

AU - Eisenberg, Marla E.

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AU - Borowsky, Iris W.

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N2 - School-based depression screening and education programs are recommended for addressing the high rates of children's mental illness. The objectives of this study were to (1) identify Minnesota parent attitudes regarding the provision of school-based depression and suicide screening and education and (2) identify predictors of parent support for these school-based programs. A random sample of 1,300 Minnesota households with children ages 5-18 years was surveyed by mail. Chi-square tests and regression analyses were used to detect differences in parent support for depression and suicide screening and education across demographic categories, and parent beliefs and knowledge about depression and suicide. The response rate of eligible households was 43 % (N = 511). Overall, 84-89 % of parents supported school-based depression and suicide screening and education. After adjusting for all variables, parent support for depression screening was associated with greater knowledge [OR 8.48, CI(1.30-55.21)] and fewer stigmatizing beliefs [OR 0.03, CI(0.01-0.12)]. Support for suicide screening was associated with fewer stigmatizing beliefs [OR 0.03, CI(0.01-0.10)]. Support for depression education was associated with fewer stigmatizing beliefs [OR 0.32, CI(0.10-1.00)] and lower educational attainment [OR 0.59, CI(0.40-0.89)]. Support for suicide education was associated with greater knowledge [OR 7.99, CI(1.02-62.68)], fewer stigmatizing beliefs [OR 0.26, CI(0.07-0.92)], and lower educational attainment [OR 0.60, CI(0.38-0.94)]. Parent support for school-based depression and suicide screening and education was high. Parent education to decrease stigmatizing beliefs and increase knowledge about depression and suicide may increase support among the minority of parents who do not endorse such programs.

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