Supportive Coparenting Relationships as a Haven of Psychological Safety at the Transition to Parenthood

Sarah J. Schoppe-Sullivan, Theresa Settle, Jin Kyung Lee, Claire M. Kamp Dush

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Guided by research on psychological safety, the authors used longitudinal survey data from a sample of 182 dual-earner male–female couples to examine the role of supportive coparenting in mediating relations between adult attachment orientations and parenting stress/satisfaction and further considered whether parenting self-efficacy moderated relations between supportive coparenting and parenting stress/satisfaction. Path analyses using IBM SPSS AMOS 22 and bootstrapping techniques indicated that fathers’ (but not mothers’) perceptions of supportive coparenting at 3 months postpartum mediated the associations between their attachment anxiety in the third trimester of pregnancy and their parenting stress and satisfaction at 9 months postpartum. Additional tests of moderation revealed that mothers’ perceptions of greater supportive coparenting were associated with lower parenting stress only when their parenting self-efficacy was low, but fathers’ perceptions of greater supportive coparenting were associated with greater parenting satisfaction only when their parenting self-efficacy was high. Implications and limitations are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)32-48
Number of pages17
JournalResearch in Human Development
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2016
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The New Parents Project was funded by the National Science Foundation (CAREER 0746548, Schoppe-Sullivan), with additional support from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD; 1K01HD056238, Kamp Dush), and The Ohio State University?s Institute for Population Research (NICHD R24HD058484) and program in Human Development and Family Science.

Publisher Copyright:
© Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

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