Support for physical activity policies and perceptions of work and neighborhood environments: Variance by BMI and activity status at the county and individual levels

Jeanette Gustat, Keelia O'Malley, Tian Hu, Rachel G. Tabak, Karin Valentine Goins, Cheryl Valko, Jill Litt, Amy Eyler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose. To examine support for local policies encouraging physical activity and perceived neighborhood environment characteristics by physical activity and weight status of respondents across U.S. counties. Design. We used a random-digit-dial, computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI) to conduct a crosssectional telephone questionnaire in selected U.S. counties in 2011. Setting. Counties with high prevalences of obesity and sedentary behavior (HH; n=884) and counties with low prevalences of obesity and sedentary behavior (LL; n = 171) were selected nationally. Subjects. Adult respondents from HH (n = 642) and LL (n = 566) counties. Measures. Questions were asked of respondents, pertaining to support for physical activity policies in various settings, neighborhood features, time spent in physical activity and sedentary behaviors, selfreported weight and height, and personal demographic information. Analysis. Means and frequencies were calculated; bivariable and multivariable linear and logistic regression models, developed. Models were adjusted for individual characteristics and county HH/LL status. Results. Respondents in LL counties perceived their neighborhood and work environments to be more supportive of healthy behaviors and were more supportive of local physical activity policies than respondents in HH counties (p < .001 for all). Positive neighborhood environment perceptions were related to reduced body mass index, increased physical activity, and decreased sedentary behavior. Conclusion: Policy support and neighborhood environments are associated with behaviors. Results can inform targeting policy agendas to facilitate the improvement of environments (community, work, and school) to be more supportive of physical activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S33-S42
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Promotion
Volume28
Issue numberSUPPL 3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Keywords

  • Built environment
  • Physical activity
  • Policy
  • Prevention research
  • Sedentary behavior

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