Supplementing Social Skills Training With Tootling to Simultaneously Enhance First-Grade Students’ Performance of Two Social Skills

Margaret Adams Crewdson, Robert David Richardson, Kristen Fowler, Christopher H. Skinner, Shelby Wright, David Cihak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

While social skills training allows students to acquire social skills, often it does not enhance their performance of those skills outside the social skills training context. A withdrawal design was used to determine if a modified Tootling intervention could enhance at-risk, first-grade students’ performance of two recently trained social skills (complimenting and encouraging) as they played. Following social skills training, baseline data was collected as students played a modified Jenga game in small groups. During the intervention phase, a Tootling intervention was added and the class earned a group reward contingent upon their reports of peers engaging in these recently trained social skills. After Tootling was withdrawn, it was reinstated. Analysis of class-wide data shows immediate and large (effect size estimates) increases in compliments and encouragements each time Tootling was applied, and an immediate decrease when Tootling was withdrawn. These findings suggest that the modified Tootling intervention enhanced performance of these social skills while students played. Discussion focuses on future research designed to determine if Tootling can cause meaningful increases in social skill development by increasing students’ performance of social skills across social contexts. Impact Statement Social skills training allows students to acquire social skills, but typically does not result in students performing these behaviors in other social contexts. A peer-mediated intervention known as Tootling, which involves students being reinforced for reporting classmates’ performance of recently trained social skills (i.e., providing encouragements and compliments), caused large and immediate increases in first-grade students’ performance of these prosocial behaviors as they engaged in a small-group game.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSchool Psychology Review
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 National Association of School Psychologists.

Keywords

  • Jorge E. Gonzalez
  • peer mediation
  • social skills development
  • social skills performance
  • social skills training
  • tootling intervention

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Supplementing Social Skills Training With Tootling to Simultaneously Enhance First-Grade Students’ Performance of Two Social Skills'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this