Supplemental instruction and the performance of developmental education students in an introductory biology course

Randy Moore, Olivia LeDee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although first-year students in Supplemental Instruction (SI) earned similar average numerical-grades in an introductory biology course as non-SI students, their grade distributions were different: SI students earned fewer Ds and Fs than non-SI students. SI students who earned As and Bs had similar admissions scores as those who earned D’s and F’s, but were distinguished by their academic behaviors: they submitted more extra-credit work and came to more classes, help sessions, and office hours than non-SI students. These data indicate that SI can help at-risk students in an introductory biology course to engage in positive academic behaviors and to improve their academic performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9-20
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of College Reading and Learning
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006

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Supplemental instruction and the performance of developmental education students in an introductory biology course. / Moore, Randy; LeDee, Olivia.

In: Journal of College Reading and Learning, Vol. 36, No. 2, 01.01.2006, p. 9-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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