Suffering in Silence: Procedural Justice Versus Gender Socialization Issues in University Sexual Harassment Grievance Procedures

Laurie A. Rudman, Eugene Borgida, Barbara A. Robertson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

41 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although some studies suggest that sexual harassment is a prevalent problem in academia, it is accompanied by consistently low reporting rates. An examination of the relative explanatory power of procedural justice (Lind & Tyler, 1988) and gender socialization (Riger, 1991) to account for this situation was conducted. Demographic, situational, and attitudinal variables representing various obstacles to filing formal grievances were assessed in two groups: reporters and nonreporters of sexual harassment. Results indicate that procedural justice (e.g., skepticism regarding the response efficacy of filing a complaint) was more related to nonreported sexual harassment than was gender socialization (e.g., a caring vs. a justice perspective). Results are discussed in terms of their implications for a broader theoretical framework and for the ways in which formal agencies that are mandated to protect university members from sexual harassment could refine their grievance procedures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)519-541
Number of pages23
JournalBasic and Applied Social Psychology
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1995

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This article is based on research supported by grants-in-aid from the University of Minnesota's Conflict and Change Center and the Minnesota Women's Center. The work of Laurie A. Rudman was supported by a National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship.

Copyright:
Copyright 2016 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

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