Successful treatment of Mycobacterium gordonae sacroiliitis using a novel minimally invasive sacroiliac joint arthrodesis

Nathan Wanderman, Joseph Thurn, Mitchell Wyffels, Jonathan N. Sembrano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Case: A 43-year-old man with a history of well-controlled HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) infection presented with sacroiliac joint destruction from a Mycobacterium gordonae infection. A sacroiliac joint arthrodesis was performed using a minimally invasive technique utilizing both biologic fusion (allograft bone with rhBMP-2 [recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2]) and fixation with titanium ingrowth rods. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of infectious sacroiliitis from a nontubercular mycobacterium (M. gordonae) treated with a combination of joint debridement, biologic fusion with bone graft, and nonbiologic functional fusion using titanium ingrowth rods, all performed in a minimally invasive fashion. This strategy effectively alleviated pain and preserved function at 2 years of follow-up.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere55
JournalJBJS case connector
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

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