Substance use patterns in 9-10 year olds: Baseline findings from the adolescent brain cognitive development (ABCD) study

ABCD Consortium

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development ™ Study (ABCD Study®) is an open-science, multi-site, prospective, longitudinal study following over 11,800 9- and 10-year-old youth into early adulthood. The ABCD Study aims to prospectively examine the impact of substance use (SU) on neurocognitive and health outcomes. Although SU initiation typically occurs during teen years, relatively little is known about patterns of SU in children younger than 12.

METHODS: This study aims to report the detailed ABCD Study® SU patterns at baseline (n = 11,875) in order to inform the greater scientific community about cohort's early SU. Along with a detailed description of SU, we ran mixed effects regression models to examine the association between early caffeine and alcohol sipping with demographic factors, externalizing symptoms and parental history of alcohol and substance use disorders (AUD/SUD).

PRIMARY RESULTS: At baseline, the majority of youth had used caffeine (67.6 %) and 22.5 % reported sipping alcohol (22.5 %). There was little to no reported use of other drug categories (0.2 % full alcohol drink, 0.7 % used nicotine, <0.1 % used any other drug of abuse). Analyses revealed that total caffeine use and early alcohol sipping were associated with demographic variables (p's<.05), externalizing symptoms (caffeine p = 0002; sipping p = .0003), and parental history of AUD (sipping p = .03).

CONCLUSIONS: ABCD Study participants aged 9-10 years old reported caffeine use and alcohol sipping experimentation, but very rare other SU. Variables linked with early childhood alcohol sipping and caffeine use should be examined as contributing factors in future longitudinal analyses examining escalating trajectories of SU in the ABCD Study cohort.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number108946
JournalDrug and alcohol dependence
Volume227
Early online dateJul 29 2021
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Andrew Nencka receives research funding from GE Healthcare .

Funding Information:
Andrew Nencka receives research funding from GE Healthcare.Data used in the preparation of this article were obtained from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive DevelopmentSM (ABCD) Study (https://abcdstudy.org), held in the NIMH Data Archive (NDA). This is a multisite, longitudinal study designed to recruit more than 10,000 children age 9-10 and follow them over 10 years into early adulthood. The ABCD Study? is supported by the National Institutes of Health and additional federal partners under award numbers U01DA041048, U01DA050989, U01DA051016, U01DA041022, U01DA051018, U01DA051037, U01DA050987, U01DA041174, U01DA041106, U01DA041117, U01DA041028, U01DA041134, U01DA050988, U01DA051039, U01DA041156, U01DA041025, U01DA041120, U01DA051038, U01DA041148, U01DA041093, U01DA041089, U24DA041123, U24DA041147. A full list of supporters is available at https://abcdstudy.org/federal-partners.html. A listing of participating sites and a complete listing of the study investigators can be found at https://abcdstudy.org/consortium_members/. ABCD consortium investigators designed and implemented the study and/or provided data but did not necessarily participate in analysis or writing of this report. Dr. Gayathri Dowling was substantially involved in all of the cited grants, Drs. Marsha Lopez and John Matochik were substantially involved in U24DA041147, and Drs. Steven Grant and Antonio Noronha were substantially involved in U24DA041123, consistent with their roles as Scientific Officers. All other Federal representatives contributed to the interpretation of the data and participated in the preparation, review and approval of the manuscript, consistent with their roles on the ABCD Federal Partners Group. The views and opinions expressed in this manuscript are those of the authors only and do not necessarily represent the views, official policy or position of ABCD consortium investigators, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services or any of its affiliated institutions or agencies. The ABCD data repository grows and changes over time. The ABCD data used in this report came from the ABCD Data Release 2.0 (DOI: 10.15154/1503209, March 2019) and ABCD Fix Release 2.0.1 (DOI: 10.15154/1504041, July 2019).

Funding Information:
Data used in the preparation of this article were obtained from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development SM (ABCD) Study ( https://abcdstudy.org ), held in the NIMH Data Archive (NDA). This is a multisite, longitudinal study designed to recruit more than 10,000 children age 9-10 and follow them over 10 years into early adulthood. The ABCD Study® is supported by the National Institutes of Health and additional federal partners under award numbers U01DA041048, U01DA050989, U01DA051016, U01DA041022, U01DA051018, U01DA051037, U01DA050987, U01DA041174, U01DA041106, U01DA041117, U01DA041028, U01DA041134, U01DA050988, U01DA051039, U01DA041156, U01DA041025, U01DA041120, U01DA051038, U01DA041148, U01DA041093, U01DA041089, U24DA041123, U24DA041147. A full list of supporters is available at https://abcdstudy.org/federal-partners.html . A listing of participating sites and a complete listing of the study investigators can be found at https://abcdstudy.org/consortium_members/ . ABCD consortium investigators designed and implemented the study and/or provided data but did not necessarily participate in analysis or writing of this report. Dr. Gayathri Dowling was substantially involved in all of the cited grants, Drs. Marsha Lopez and John Matochik were substantially involved in U24DA041147, and Drs. Steven Grant and Antonio Noronha were substantially involved in U24DA041123, consistent with their roles as Scientific Officers. All other Federal representatives contributed to the interpretation of the data and participated in the preparation, review and approval of the manuscript, consistent with their roles on the ABCD Federal Partners Group. The views and opinions expressed in this manuscript are those of the authors only and do not necessarily represent the views, official policy or position of ABCD consortium investigators, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services or any of its affiliated institutions or agencies. The ABCD data repository grows and changes over time. The ABCD data used in this report came from the ABCD Data Release 2.0 (DOI: 10.15154/1503209, March 2019) and ABCD Fix Release 2.0.1 (DOI: 10.15154/1504041, July 2019).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Elsevier B.V.

Keywords

  • ABCD study
  • Alcohol
  • Alcohol sipping
  • Caffeine
  • Cannabis
  • Children
  • Externalizing behaviors
  • Nicotine

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

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