Subjective norms about condoms are better predictors of use and intention to use than attitudes

Michael W. Ross, M. L. Mclaws

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Scopus citations

Abstract

In a study of the applicability of the Theory of Reasoned Action to condom use, 173 homosexually active men were administered a questionnaire assessing attitutes toward and intentions to use condoms, behavioral beliefs about condoms, and subjective norms and normative behavior regarding condom use. Results indicated that attitudes toward condoms were poor predictors of intention to use condoms, but that subjective norms were good predictors of intention. Previous condom use was a good predictor of intention to use. These data suggest that interventions which emphasize peer-based education are likely to be more useful than those which attempt to alter behavioral beliefs about, and attitudes toward, condoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)335-339
Number of pages5
JournalHealth Education Research
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 1992

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