Studies on the viability and membrane integrity of human spermatozoa treated with essential oil of Trachyspermum ammi (L.) Sprague ex Turrill fruit

S. Paul, Sun Chul Kang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study aimed at investigating the effects of essential oil of Trachyspermum ammi fruits, an oil-bearing plant of Apiaceae family, on human sperm viability and membrane integrity. Chemical compositions of the oil were analysed by GC-MS. Thirty compounds representing 91.39% of the total oil were identified. The viability and membrane integrity of human spermatozoa were assessed using minimum effective dose (MED) concentration (125μgml -1) of the oil. Sperm treated with essential oil showed a significant decrease (P<0.05) in viability assessed by eosin-nigrosin and fluorescence dual staining. Moreover, the treated sperm also showed a significant loss (P<0.05) of functional mitochondria and antioxidant enzyme, catalase (EC 1.11.1.6, CAT), when compared to control. The cholesterol:phospholipid ratio was also increased (P<0.05) in treated sperm when compared to control, which is an indicator of loss of binding ability of human spermatozoa to the zona pellucida. The scanning electron microscopic studies demonstrated the loss of membrane integrity in essential oil-treated human spermatozoa, which showed vacuolation, swelling of acrosomal cap, detachment of head portion and tail coiling. Present observations indicate the spermicidal property of essential oil of T. ammi fruits, which could be helpful to develop medicinal preparations as a male contraceptive.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)117-125
Number of pages9
JournalAndrologia
Volume44
Issue numberSUPPL.1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cholesterol: phospholipid
  • Essential oil
  • Mitochondrial function
  • Spermicidal
  • Terpene
  • Trachyspermum ammi

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Studies on the viability and membrane integrity of human spermatozoa treated with essential oil of Trachyspermum ammi (L.) Sprague ex Turrill fruit'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this