Student-inflicted injuries to staff in schools

Comparing risk between educators and non-educators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective Student-inflicted injury to staff in the educational services sector is a growing concern. Studies on violence have focused on teachers as victims, but less is known about injuries to other employee groups, particularly educational assistants. Inequities may be present, as educational assistants and non-educators may not have the same wage, benefits, training and employment protections available to them as professional educators. We identified risk factors for student-related injury and their characteristics among employees in school districts. Methods Workers' compensation data were used to identify incidence and severity of student-related injury. Rates were calculated using negative binomial regression; risk factors were identified using multivariate models to calculate rate ratios (RR) and 95% CIs. Results Over 26% of all injuries were student-related; 8% resulted in lost work time. Special and general education assistants experienced significantly increased risk of injury (RR=6.0, CI 5.05 to 7.15; RR=2.07, CI 1.40 to 3.07) as compared with educators. Risk differed by age, gender and school district type. Text analyses categorised student-related injury. It revealed injury from students acting out occurred most frequently (45.4%), whereas injuries involving play with students resulted in the highest percentage of lost-time injuries (17.7%) compared with all interaction categories. Conclusion Student-inflicted injury to staff occurs frequently and can be severe. Special education and general assistants bear the largest burden of injury compared with educators. A variety of prevention techniques to reduce injury risk and severity, including policy or environmental modifications, may be appropriate. Equal access to risk reduction methods for all staff should be prioritised.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)116-122
Number of pages7
JournalInjury Prevention
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

Fingerprint

Students
Wounds and Injuries
Special Education
Environmental Policy
Acting Out
Workers' Compensation
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Risk Reduction Behavior
Violence
Incidence

Keywords

  • injury compensation
  • occupational injury
  • risk factor research
  • school
  • violence
  • workplace

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Cite this

Student-inflicted injuries to staff in schools : Comparing risk between educators and non-educators. / Schofield, Katherine E; Ryan, Andrew; Stroinski, Craig.

In: Injury Prevention, Vol. 25, No. 2, 01.04.2019, p. 116-122.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{b817318980974a288d670f728c7a6049,
title = "Student-inflicted injuries to staff in schools: Comparing risk between educators and non-educators",
abstract = "Objective Student-inflicted injury to staff in the educational services sector is a growing concern. Studies on violence have focused on teachers as victims, but less is known about injuries to other employee groups, particularly educational assistants. Inequities may be present, as educational assistants and non-educators may not have the same wage, benefits, training and employment protections available to them as professional educators. We identified risk factors for student-related injury and their characteristics among employees in school districts. Methods Workers' compensation data were used to identify incidence and severity of student-related injury. Rates were calculated using negative binomial regression; risk factors were identified using multivariate models to calculate rate ratios (RR) and 95{\%} CIs. Results Over 26{\%} of all injuries were student-related; 8{\%} resulted in lost work time. Special and general education assistants experienced significantly increased risk of injury (RR=6.0, CI 5.05 to 7.15; RR=2.07, CI 1.40 to 3.07) as compared with educators. Risk differed by age, gender and school district type. Text analyses categorised student-related injury. It revealed injury from students acting out occurred most frequently (45.4{\%}), whereas injuries involving play with students resulted in the highest percentage of lost-time injuries (17.7{\%}) compared with all interaction categories. Conclusion Student-inflicted injury to staff occurs frequently and can be severe. Special education and general assistants bear the largest burden of injury compared with educators. A variety of prevention techniques to reduce injury risk and severity, including policy or environmental modifications, may be appropriate. Equal access to risk reduction methods for all staff should be prioritised.",
keywords = "injury compensation, occupational injury, risk factor research, school, violence, workplace",
author = "Schofield, {Katherine E} and Andrew Ryan and Craig Stroinski",
year = "2019",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1136/injuryprev-2017-042472",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "25",
pages = "116--122",
journal = "Injury Prevention",
issn = "1353-8047",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Student-inflicted injuries to staff in schools

T2 - Comparing risk between educators and non-educators

AU - Schofield, Katherine E

AU - Ryan, Andrew

AU - Stroinski, Craig

PY - 2019/4/1

Y1 - 2019/4/1

N2 - Objective Student-inflicted injury to staff in the educational services sector is a growing concern. Studies on violence have focused on teachers as victims, but less is known about injuries to other employee groups, particularly educational assistants. Inequities may be present, as educational assistants and non-educators may not have the same wage, benefits, training and employment protections available to them as professional educators. We identified risk factors for student-related injury and their characteristics among employees in school districts. Methods Workers' compensation data were used to identify incidence and severity of student-related injury. Rates were calculated using negative binomial regression; risk factors were identified using multivariate models to calculate rate ratios (RR) and 95% CIs. Results Over 26% of all injuries were student-related; 8% resulted in lost work time. Special and general education assistants experienced significantly increased risk of injury (RR=6.0, CI 5.05 to 7.15; RR=2.07, CI 1.40 to 3.07) as compared with educators. Risk differed by age, gender and school district type. Text analyses categorised student-related injury. It revealed injury from students acting out occurred most frequently (45.4%), whereas injuries involving play with students resulted in the highest percentage of lost-time injuries (17.7%) compared with all interaction categories. Conclusion Student-inflicted injury to staff occurs frequently and can be severe. Special education and general assistants bear the largest burden of injury compared with educators. A variety of prevention techniques to reduce injury risk and severity, including policy or environmental modifications, may be appropriate. Equal access to risk reduction methods for all staff should be prioritised.

AB - Objective Student-inflicted injury to staff in the educational services sector is a growing concern. Studies on violence have focused on teachers as victims, but less is known about injuries to other employee groups, particularly educational assistants. Inequities may be present, as educational assistants and non-educators may not have the same wage, benefits, training and employment protections available to them as professional educators. We identified risk factors for student-related injury and their characteristics among employees in school districts. Methods Workers' compensation data were used to identify incidence and severity of student-related injury. Rates were calculated using negative binomial regression; risk factors were identified using multivariate models to calculate rate ratios (RR) and 95% CIs. Results Over 26% of all injuries were student-related; 8% resulted in lost work time. Special and general education assistants experienced significantly increased risk of injury (RR=6.0, CI 5.05 to 7.15; RR=2.07, CI 1.40 to 3.07) as compared with educators. Risk differed by age, gender and school district type. Text analyses categorised student-related injury. It revealed injury from students acting out occurred most frequently (45.4%), whereas injuries involving play with students resulted in the highest percentage of lost-time injuries (17.7%) compared with all interaction categories. Conclusion Student-inflicted injury to staff occurs frequently and can be severe. Special education and general assistants bear the largest burden of injury compared with educators. A variety of prevention techniques to reduce injury risk and severity, including policy or environmental modifications, may be appropriate. Equal access to risk reduction methods for all staff should be prioritised.

KW - injury compensation

KW - occupational injury

KW - risk factor research

KW - school

KW - violence

KW - workplace

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85049080236&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85049080236&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1136/injuryprev-2017-042472

DO - 10.1136/injuryprev-2017-042472

M3 - Article

VL - 25

SP - 116

EP - 122

JO - Injury Prevention

JF - Injury Prevention

SN - 1353-8047

IS - 2

ER -