Striking a Chord: Assessing the Impact of a Librarian/Physician-Led EBM Project on Medical Student Confidence around Critical Appraisal and Effective Patient Communication

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Purpose: To assess the impact of a 4-week evidence-based medicine (EBM) and health literacy assignment on medical students’ confidence to find, critically appraise and summarize literature and then appropriately communicate it to patients using plain language principles. The results will be used to evaluate and redesign the assignment, a 10+ year long collaboration between librarians and medical school faculty.

Methods: Third and fourth-year medical students completing a Family Medicine Clerkship completed a survey both before and after participating in the 4-week course. This survey captured their confidence in various aspects of EBM and health literacy. Demographic information, including medical specialization, was also gathered. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to assess the magnitude and significance of any change in confidence and potential moderators, and analysis of subgroups was performed.

Results: 93 participants responded to both the pre- and post-tests. The survey results showed that the course increased student confidence in both applying EBM concepts and in health literacy and patient communication. The largest gains in confidence in applying EBM concepts were seen in assigning a strength of recommendation (18.7% increase) and formulating an answerable question (17.5%). The largest gains in confidence in health literacy and patient communication were seen in defining health literacy (28.3%) and in finding appropriate consumer resources for further information (18.3%).

Evaluation: Surveys of student confidence in EBM and Health Literacy concepts, conducted both pre and post-intervention.
Original languageEnglish (US)
StatePublished - Oct 7 2018
EventMedical Library Association Midwest Chapter Annual Meeting - Cleveland, United States
Duration: Oct 5 2018Oct 9 2018

Conference

ConferenceMedical Library Association Midwest Chapter Annual Meeting
CountryUnited States
CityCleveland
Period10/5/1810/9/18

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Librarians
Health Literacy
Evidence-Based Medicine
Medical Students
Communication
Physicians
Students
Medical Faculties
Medical Schools
Language
Medicine
Demography
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

Striking a Chord: Assessing the Impact of a Librarian/Physician-Led EBM Project on Medical Student Confidence around Critical Appraisal and Effective Patient Communication. / Brown, Sarah J; Bakker, Caitlin J; Power, David V; Frenz, David A; Beattie, James W; Koffel, Jonathan B.

2018. Paper presented at Medical Library Association Midwest Chapter Annual Meeting, Cleveland, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Brown, SJ, Bakker, CJ, Power, DV, Frenz, DA, Beattie, JW & Koffel, JB 2018, 'Striking a Chord: Assessing the Impact of a Librarian/Physician-Led EBM Project on Medical Student Confidence around Critical Appraisal and Effective Patient Communication' Paper presented at Medical Library Association Midwest Chapter Annual Meeting, Cleveland, United States, 10/5/18 - 10/9/18, .
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title = "Striking a Chord: Assessing the Impact of a Librarian/Physician-Led EBM Project on Medical Student Confidence around Critical Appraisal and Effective Patient Communication",
abstract = "Purpose: To assess the impact of a 4-week evidence-based medicine (EBM) and health literacy assignment on medical students’ confidence to find, critically appraise and summarize literature and then appropriately communicate it to patients using plain language principles. The results will be used to evaluate and redesign the assignment, a 10+ year long collaboration between librarians and medical school faculty.Methods: Third and fourth-year medical students completing a Family Medicine Clerkship completed a survey both before and after participating in the 4-week course. This survey captured their confidence in various aspects of EBM and health literacy. Demographic information, including medical specialization, was also gathered. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to assess the magnitude and significance of any change in confidence and potential moderators, and analysis of subgroups was performed. Results: 93 participants responded to both the pre- and post-tests. The survey results showed that the course increased student confidence in both applying EBM concepts and in health literacy and patient communication. The largest gains in confidence in applying EBM concepts were seen in assigning a strength of recommendation (18.7{\%} increase) and formulating an answerable question (17.5{\%}). The largest gains in confidence in health literacy and patient communication were seen in defining health literacy (28.3{\%}) and in finding appropriate consumer resources for further information (18.3{\%}). Evaluation: Surveys of student confidence in EBM and Health Literacy concepts, conducted both pre and post-intervention.",
author = "Brown, {Sarah J} and Bakker, {Caitlin J} and Power, {David V} and Frenz, {David A} and Beattie, {James W} and Koffel, {Jonathan B}",
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language = "English (US)",
note = "Medical Library Association Midwest Chapter Annual Meeting ; Conference date: 05-10-2018 Through 09-10-2018",

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T1 - Striking a Chord: Assessing the Impact of a Librarian/Physician-Led EBM Project on Medical Student Confidence around Critical Appraisal and Effective Patient Communication

AU - Brown, Sarah J

AU - Bakker, Caitlin J

AU - Power, David V

AU - Frenz, David A

AU - Beattie, James W

AU - Koffel, Jonathan B

PY - 2018/10/7

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N2 - Purpose: To assess the impact of a 4-week evidence-based medicine (EBM) and health literacy assignment on medical students’ confidence to find, critically appraise and summarize literature and then appropriately communicate it to patients using plain language principles. The results will be used to evaluate and redesign the assignment, a 10+ year long collaboration between librarians and medical school faculty.Methods: Third and fourth-year medical students completing a Family Medicine Clerkship completed a survey both before and after participating in the 4-week course. This survey captured their confidence in various aspects of EBM and health literacy. Demographic information, including medical specialization, was also gathered. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to assess the magnitude and significance of any change in confidence and potential moderators, and analysis of subgroups was performed. Results: 93 participants responded to both the pre- and post-tests. The survey results showed that the course increased student confidence in both applying EBM concepts and in health literacy and patient communication. The largest gains in confidence in applying EBM concepts were seen in assigning a strength of recommendation (18.7% increase) and formulating an answerable question (17.5%). The largest gains in confidence in health literacy and patient communication were seen in defining health literacy (28.3%) and in finding appropriate consumer resources for further information (18.3%). Evaluation: Surveys of student confidence in EBM and Health Literacy concepts, conducted both pre and post-intervention.

AB - Purpose: To assess the impact of a 4-week evidence-based medicine (EBM) and health literacy assignment on medical students’ confidence to find, critically appraise and summarize literature and then appropriately communicate it to patients using plain language principles. The results will be used to evaluate and redesign the assignment, a 10+ year long collaboration between librarians and medical school faculty.Methods: Third and fourth-year medical students completing a Family Medicine Clerkship completed a survey both before and after participating in the 4-week course. This survey captured their confidence in various aspects of EBM and health literacy. Demographic information, including medical specialization, was also gathered. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to assess the magnitude and significance of any change in confidence and potential moderators, and analysis of subgroups was performed. Results: 93 participants responded to both the pre- and post-tests. The survey results showed that the course increased student confidence in both applying EBM concepts and in health literacy and patient communication. The largest gains in confidence in applying EBM concepts were seen in assigning a strength of recommendation (18.7% increase) and formulating an answerable question (17.5%). The largest gains in confidence in health literacy and patient communication were seen in defining health literacy (28.3%) and in finding appropriate consumer resources for further information (18.3%). Evaluation: Surveys of student confidence in EBM and Health Literacy concepts, conducted both pre and post-intervention.

M3 - Paper

ER -