Strategies to reduce indoor tanning: Current research gaps and future opportunities for prevention

Dawn M. Holman, Kathleen A. Fox, Jeffrey D. Glenn, Gery P. Guy, Meg Watson, Katie Baker, Vilma Cokkinides, Mark Gottlieb, Deann Lazovich, Frank M. Perna, Blake P. Sampson, Andrew B. Seidenberg, Craig Sinclair, Alan C. Geller

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

43 Scopus citations

Abstract

Exposure to ultraviolet radiation from indoor tanning device use is associated with an increased risk of skin cancer, including risk of malignant melanoma, and is an urgent public health problem. By reducing indoor tanning, future cases of skin cancer could be prevented, along with the associated morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs. On August 20, 2012, the CDC hosted a meeting to discuss the current body of evidence on strategies to reduce indoor tanning as well as research gaps. Using the Action Model to Achieve Healthy People 2020 Overarching Goals as a framework, the current paper provides highlights on the topics that were discussed, including (1) the state of the evidence on strategies to reduce indoor tanning; (2) the tools necessary to effectively assess, monitor, and evaluate the short- and long-term impact of interventions designed to reduce indoor tanning; and (3) strategies to align efforts at the national, state, and local levels through transdisciplinary collaboration and coordination across multiple sectors. Although many challenges and barriers exist, a coordinated, multilevel, transdisciplinary approach has the potential to reduce indoor tanning and prevent future cases of skin cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)672-681
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican journal of preventive medicine
Volume44
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2013

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