States' accommodations policies and development of alternate assessments based on modified achievement standards: A discriminant analysis

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9 Scopus citations

Abstract

The characteristics of a state's accommodations policy may affect a state's decision about whether to develop an alternate assessment based on modified achievement standards (AA-MAS). A very restrictive accommodations policy may make it more difficult for some students to participate in the state's regular assessment used for accountability purposes. Descriptive discriminant analysis was used to identify whether differences in the number of allowed accommodations in five categories (presentation, equipment and materials, response, scheduling and timing, setting) differentiated between states that planned to offer an AA-MAS and those that did not. The results of this study provide preliminary evidence that the number of presentation accommodations a state's policy allowed may be related to the decision the state made about whether to develop an AA-MAS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)301-308
Number of pages8
JournalRemedial and Special Education
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research and/or authorship of this article: The preparation of this article was supported in part by General Supervision Enhancement Grants (#H373X070021 and #H373X070024) from the Research to Practice Division, Office of Special Education Programs, U.S. Department of Education, and the University of Minnesota, National Center on Educational Outcomes. Opinions or points of view expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Department of Education.

Keywords

  • accommodations
  • accountability
  • alternate assessment

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