Stability concepts of riverbanks: A case study of riverbank erosion along the snake river, Oregon

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This article uses a recent study of riverbank erosion to showcase some of the conceptual features of evaluating an eroding soil slope. The focus of this article is on the assumptions and decisions made before and after the stability calculation. Although the larger project evaluated the overall impacts of the river on erosion, this article will only discuss the riverbank stability component. The choices made prior to the calculation, including identification of the input parameters and analysis methods, determine the calculation output and needs to be considered in the output interpretation. Evaluating natural, non-engineered slopes also requires careful evaluation of safety factor concepts. Failure types and the environments they result from are likely more significant for the understanding of erosion potential than the safety factor.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationGeotechnical Practice Publication
EditorsR.L. Wiltshire, C.M. Goss, H.W. Olsen
Pages92-100
Number of pages9
StatePublished - 2005
EventH2GEO Geotechnical Engineering for Water Resources - Proceedings of the Biennial Denver Geotechnical Symposium - Denver, CO, United States
Duration: Oct 22 2004Oct 22 2004

Publication series

NameGeotechnical Practice Publication

Other

OtherH2GEO Geotechnical Engineering for Water Resources - Proceedings of the Biennial Denver Geotechnical Symposium
CountryUnited States
CityDenver, CO
Period10/22/0410/22/04

Fingerprint

Erosion
Rivers
Safety factor
Soils

Cite this

Chapman, J. A. (2005). Stability concepts of riverbanks: A case study of riverbank erosion along the snake river, Oregon. In R. L. Wiltshire, C. M. Goss, & H. W. Olsen (Eds.), Geotechnical Practice Publication (pp. 92-100). (Geotechnical Practice Publication).

Stability concepts of riverbanks : A case study of riverbank erosion along the snake river, Oregon. / Chapman, John A.

Geotechnical Practice Publication. ed. / R.L. Wiltshire; C.M. Goss; H.W. Olsen. 2005. p. 92-100 (Geotechnical Practice Publication).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Chapman, JA 2005, Stability concepts of riverbanks: A case study of riverbank erosion along the snake river, Oregon. in RL Wiltshire, CM Goss & HW Olsen (eds), Geotechnical Practice Publication. Geotechnical Practice Publication, pp. 92-100, H2GEO Geotechnical Engineering for Water Resources - Proceedings of the Biennial Denver Geotechnical Symposium, Denver, CO, United States, 10/22/04.
Chapman JA. Stability concepts of riverbanks: A case study of riverbank erosion along the snake river, Oregon. In Wiltshire RL, Goss CM, Olsen HW, editors, Geotechnical Practice Publication. 2005. p. 92-100. (Geotechnical Practice Publication).
Chapman, John A. / Stability concepts of riverbanks : A case study of riverbank erosion along the snake river, Oregon. Geotechnical Practice Publication. editor / R.L. Wiltshire ; C.M. Goss ; H.W. Olsen. 2005. pp. 92-100 (Geotechnical Practice Publication).
@inproceedings{da949dda056e47938ffc7053f9a31cde,
title = "Stability concepts of riverbanks: A case study of riverbank erosion along the snake river, Oregon",
abstract = "This article uses a recent study of riverbank erosion to showcase some of the conceptual features of evaluating an eroding soil slope. The focus of this article is on the assumptions and decisions made before and after the stability calculation. Although the larger project evaluated the overall impacts of the river on erosion, this article will only discuss the riverbank stability component. The choices made prior to the calculation, including identification of the input parameters and analysis methods, determine the calculation output and needs to be considered in the output interpretation. Evaluating natural, non-engineered slopes also requires careful evaluation of safety factor concepts. Failure types and the environments they result from are likely more significant for the understanding of erosion potential than the safety factor.",
author = "Chapman, {John A.}",
year = "2005",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "0784407584",
series = "Geotechnical Practice Publication",
pages = "92--100",
editor = "R.L. Wiltshire and C.M. Goss and H.W. Olsen",
booktitle = "Geotechnical Practice Publication",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Stability concepts of riverbanks

T2 - A case study of riverbank erosion along the snake river, Oregon

AU - Chapman, John A.

PY - 2005

Y1 - 2005

N2 - This article uses a recent study of riverbank erosion to showcase some of the conceptual features of evaluating an eroding soil slope. The focus of this article is on the assumptions and decisions made before and after the stability calculation. Although the larger project evaluated the overall impacts of the river on erosion, this article will only discuss the riverbank stability component. The choices made prior to the calculation, including identification of the input parameters and analysis methods, determine the calculation output and needs to be considered in the output interpretation. Evaluating natural, non-engineered slopes also requires careful evaluation of safety factor concepts. Failure types and the environments they result from are likely more significant for the understanding of erosion potential than the safety factor.

AB - This article uses a recent study of riverbank erosion to showcase some of the conceptual features of evaluating an eroding soil slope. The focus of this article is on the assumptions and decisions made before and after the stability calculation. Although the larger project evaluated the overall impacts of the river on erosion, this article will only discuss the riverbank stability component. The choices made prior to the calculation, including identification of the input parameters and analysis methods, determine the calculation output and needs to be considered in the output interpretation. Evaluating natural, non-engineered slopes also requires careful evaluation of safety factor concepts. Failure types and the environments they result from are likely more significant for the understanding of erosion potential than the safety factor.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=11144351692&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=11144351692&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:11144351692

SN - 0784407584

SN - 9780784407585

T3 - Geotechnical Practice Publication

SP - 92

EP - 100

BT - Geotechnical Practice Publication

A2 - Wiltshire, R.L.

A2 - Goss, C.M.

A2 - Olsen, H.W.

ER -