Species of dickeya and pectobacterium isolated during an outbreak of blackleg and soft rot of potato in northeastern and north central united states

Rebecca D. Curland, Amanda Mainello, Keith L. Perry, Jianjun Hao, Amy O. Charkowski, Carolee T. Bull, R. R McNally, Steven B. Johnson, Noah Rosenzweig, Gary A. Secor, Robert P. Larkin, Beth K. Gugino, Carol A Ishimaru

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

An outbreak of bacterial soft rot and blackleg of potato has occurred since 2014 with the epicenter being in the northeastern region of the United States. Multiple species of Pectobacterium and Dickeya are causal agents, resulting in losses to commercial and seed potato production over the past decade in the Northeastern and North Central United States. To clarify the pathogen present at the outset of the epidemic in 2015 and 2016, a phylogenetic study was made of 121 pectolytic soft rot bacteria isolated from symptomatic potato; also included were 27 type strains of Dickeya and Pectobacterium species, and 47 historic reference strains. Phylogenetic trees constructed based on multilocus sequence alignments of concatenated dnaJ, dnaX and gyrB fragments revealed the epidemic isolates to cluster with type strains of D. chrysanthemi, D. dianthicola, D. dadantii, P. atrosepti-cum, P. brasiliense, P. carotovorum, P. parmentieri, P. polaris, P. punjabense, and P. versatile. Genetic diversity within D. dianthicola strains was low, with one sequence type (ST1) identified in 17 of 19 strains. Pectobacterium parmentieri was more diverse, with ten sequence types detected among 37 of the 2015–2016 strains. This study can aid in monitoring future shifts in potato soft rot pathogens within the U.S. and inform strategies for disease management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1733
JournalMicroorganisms
Volume9
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 14 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was funded by United States Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service State Partnership Potato Program 8030-62660-003-00D. Funding for the project came from Minnesota Department of Agriculture/USDA Farm Bill, Northern Plains Potato Growers As-sociation, Cavendish Farms, MN Area II Potato Research and Promotion Council, and Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station, and the United States Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture Federal Appropriations (USDA-NIFA), United States Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service State Partnership Potato Program 8030-62660-003-00D, Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture, and USDA-NIFA-Hatch ME022010 through the Maine Agricultural and Forest Experiment Station, and Maine Agricultural and Forest Experiment Publi-cation Number 3827. We thank Blake Webster and Hilary Snyder for technical assistance and A. P. Robinson, K. Sather, and J. Miller for providing soft rot samples from commercial and seed potato fields in Minnesota and North Dakota. The helpful discussions and agency of Kromroy and J. Ci-borowski, Minnesota Department of Agriculture, are especially acknowledged. Thank you to the Pennsylvania Co-Operative Potato Growers for connecting growers with symptomatic potatoes to researchers.

Funding Information:
Funding: This research was funded by United States Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service State Partnership Potato Program 8030-62660-003-00D. Funding for the project came from Minnesota Department of Agriculture/USDA Farm Bill, Northern Plains Potato Growers Association, Cavendish Farms, MN Area II Potato Research and Promotion Council, and Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station, and the United States Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture Federal Appropriations (USDA-NIFA), United States Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service State Partnership Potato Program 8030-62660-003-00D, Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture, and USDA-NIFA-Hatch ME022010 through the Maine Agricultural and Forest Experiment Station, and Maine Agricultural and Forest Experiment Publication Number 3827.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

Keywords

  • Blackleg
  • Pectobacteriaceae
  • Phylogeny
  • Plant bacteriology
  • Solanum tuberosum

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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