Spatiotemporal changes in influenza A virus prevalence among wild waterfowl inhabiting the continental United States throughout the annual cycle

Cody M. Kent, Andrew M. Ramey, Joshua T. Ackerman, Justin Bahl, Sarah N. Bevins, Andrew S. Bowman, Walter M. Boyce, Carol J. Cardona, Michael L. Casazza, Troy D. Cline, Susan E. De La Cruz, Jeffrey S. Hall, Nichola J. Hill, Hon S. Ip, Scott Krauss, Jennifer M. Mullinax, Jacqueline M. Nolting, Magdalena Plancarte, Rebecca L. Poulson, Jonathan A. RunstadlerRichard D. Slemons, David E. Stallknecht, Jeffery D. Sullivan, John Y. Takekawa, Richard J. Webby, Robert G. Webster, Diann J. Prosser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Avian influenza viruses can pose serious risks to agricultural production, human health, and wildlife. An understanding of viruses in wild reservoir species across time and space is important to informing surveillance programs, risk models, and potential population impacts for vulnerable species. Although it is recognized that influenza A virus prevalence peaks in reservoir waterfowl in late summer through autumn, temporal and spatial variation across species has not been fully characterized. We combined two large influenza databases for North America and applied spatiotemporal models to explore patterns in prevalence throughout the annual cycle and across the continental United States for 30 waterfowl species. Peaks in prevalence in late summer through autumn were pronounced for dabbling ducks in the genera Anas and Spatula, but not Mareca. Spatially, areas of high prevalence appeared to be related to regional duck density, with highest predicted prevalence found across the upper Midwest during early fall, though further study is needed. We documented elevated prevalence in late winter and early spring, particularly in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley. Our results suggest that spatiotemporal variation in prevalence outside autumn staging areas may also represent a dynamic parameter to be considered in IAV ecology and associated risks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number13083
JournalScientific reports
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors would like to thank those who contributed to the collection of samples included in the USDA and IRD databases. This research was supported by the U.S. Geological Survey Ecosystems Mission Area and USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service under Cooperative Agreement 6000001762. The use of trade, product, or firm names in this publication is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

Funding Information:
The authors would like to thank those who contributed to the collection of samples included in the USDA and IRD databases. This research was supported by the U.S. Geological Survey Ecosystems Mission Area and USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service under Cooperative Agreement 6000001762. The use of trade, product, or firm names in this publication is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022, The Author(s).

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