Spatiotemporal aggregation for temporally extensive international microdata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We describe a strategy for regionalizing subnational administrative units in conjunction with harmonizing changes in unit boundaries over time that can be applied to provide small-area geographic identifiers for census microdata. The availability of small-area identifiers blends the flexibility of individual microdata with the spatial specificity of aggregate data. Regionalizing microdata by administrative units poses a number of challenges, such as the need to aggregate individual scale data in a way that ensures confidentiality and issues arising from changing spatial boundaries over time. We describe a regionalization and harmonization strategy that creates units that satisfy spatial and other constraints while maximizing the number of units in a way that supports policy and research use. We describe this regionalization strategy for three test cases of Malawi, Brazil, and the United States. We test different algorithms and develop a semi-automated strategy for regionalization that meets data restrictions, computation, and data demands from end users.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)26-37
Number of pages12
JournalComputers, Environment and Urban Systems
Volume63
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2017

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aggregation
regionalization
aggregate data
Malawi
harmonization
census
flexibility
Brazil
time
test

Keywords

  • Census microdata
  • Cluster analysis
  • Regionalization

Cite this

Spatiotemporal aggregation for temporally extensive international microdata. / Kugler, Tracy A.; Manson, Steven M.; Donato, Joshua R.

In: Computers, Environment and Urban Systems, Vol. 63, 01.05.2017, p. 26-37.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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