Sorptive and reactive scavenger-containing sandwich membranes as contaminant barriers

Erin M. Surdo, E. L. Cussler, William A. Arnold

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The barrier properties of composite membranes containing either zero-valent iron nanoparticles or powdered activated carbon mixed into an aqueous clay suspension and sandwiched between two sheets of high-density polyethylene were measured using carbon tetrachloride and trichloroethylene as model contaminants. The lag time to trichloroethylene breakthrough increased 17-fold when 24 wt % powdered activated carbon was mixed into the 400-μm -thick center layer of the composite. Zero-valent iron was successful in extending the lag time for carbon tetrachloride but not for trichloroethylene, presumably because the latter reaction with zero-valent iron is slow relative to diffusion. Approximately 30% of the total iron in the composite membrane was consumed before carbon tetrachloride breakthrough, a major improvement over the 2-3% reported previously for single-layer high-density polyethylene membranes containing iron nanoparticles. Simplified multilayer membrane models used to describe contaminant breakthrough are consistent with the experimental results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)69-76
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Environmental Engineering
Volume135
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 29 2009

Fingerprint

scavenger
Iron
Trichloroethylene
trichloroethylene
Carbon tetrachloride
Impurities
Carbon Tetrachloride
membrane
Membranes
pollutant
iron
Composite membranes
activated carbon
Polyethylene
High density polyethylenes
carbon
Activated carbon
Nanoparticles
fold
Suspensions

Keywords

  • Activated carbon
  • Barriers
  • Clay liners
  • Diffusion
  • Geomembranes
  • Halogen organic compounds
  • Iron
  • Polyethylene

Cite this

Sorptive and reactive scavenger-containing sandwich membranes as contaminant barriers. / Surdo, Erin M.; Cussler, E. L.; Arnold, William A.

In: Journal of Environmental Engineering, Vol. 135, No. 2, 29.10.2009, p. 69-76.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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