Soil temperature following logging-debris manipulation and aspen regrowth in minnesota: Implications for sampling depth and alteration of soil processes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Soil temperature is a fundamental controller of processes influencing the transformation and flux of soil C and nutrients following forest harvest. Soil temperature response to harvesting is influenced by the amount of logging debris (biomass) removal that occurs, but the duration, magnitude, and depth of influence is unclear. Logging debris manipulations (none, moderate, and heavy amounts) were applied following clearcut harvesting at four aspen-dominated (Populus tremuloides Michx.) sites in northeastern Minnesota, and temperature was measured at 10-, 30-, and 50-cm depths for two growing seasons. Across sites, soil temperature was significantly greater at all sample depths relative to uncut forest in some periods of each year, but the increase was reduced with increasing logging-debris retention. When logging debris was removed compared to when it was retained in the first growing season, mean growing season soil temperatures were 0.9, 1.0, and 0.8°C greater at 10-, 30-, and 50-cm depths, respectively. These patterns were also observed early in the second growing season, but there was no discernible difference among treatments later in the growing season due to the modifying effect of rapid aspen regrowth. Where vegetation establishment and growth occurs quickly, effects of logging debris removal on soil temperature and the processes influenced by it will likely be short-lived. The significant increase in soil temperature that occurred in deep soil for at least 2 yr after harvest supports an argument for deeper soil sampling than commonly occurs in experimental studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1818-1824
Number of pages7
JournalSoil Science Society of America Journal
Volume77
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2013

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Soil temperature following logging-debris manipulation and aspen regrowth in minnesota: Implications for sampling depth and alteration of soil processes'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this