Soil carbon redistribution and organo-mineral associations after lateral soil movement and mixing in a first-order forest watershed

Beth A. Fisher, Anthony K. Aufdenkampe, Kyungsoo Yoo, Rolf E. Aalto, Julia Marquard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We test the hypothesis that erosion driven soil movement on hillslopes results in an increase in new organomineral associations and overall organic matter storage in colluvial deposits within a forested hillslope. We measured mineral specific surface area (SSA), organic carbon (OC), meteoric radioisotopes (210Pb, 137Cs, 10Be), soil physical properties, C/N, δ15N, δ13C, and ∆14C in bulk soil and density fractions in a hillslope transect of soil pits. The quantity of OC per unit of mineral surface area (OC/SA) and OC inventories increased by a factor of 2–3 in depositional sites as result of soil mixing due to erosional movement as confirmed by 210Pb, 137Cs, and 10Be profiles and inventories. Soil mixing systematically decreased C/N and enriched stable isotopes of δ13C and δ15N, revealing that formation of organomineral associations instead of microbial processing was responsible for depth trends in organic matter composition. Our findings indicate that the processes that associate organic matter and minerals are fundamentally linked with organic matter composition, and OC/SA, C/N, δ13C, and δ15N provide proxies for organic matter stabilization by soil minerals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)142-155
Number of pages14
JournalGeoderma
Volume319
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2018

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soil movement
forested watersheds
soil carbon
soil organic matter
watershed
minerals
carbon
organic carbon
mineral
organic matter
hillslope
soil
surface area
colluvium
carbon footprint
radionuclides
soil physical properties
soil erosion
stable isotopes
colluvial deposit

Keywords

  • Critical Zone
  • Hillslope processes
  • Mineral surface area
  • Organic carbon

Cite this

Soil carbon redistribution and organo-mineral associations after lateral soil movement and mixing in a first-order forest watershed. / Fisher, Beth A.; Aufdenkampe, Anthony K.; Yoo, Kyungsoo; Aalto, Rolf E.; Marquard, Julia.

In: Geoderma, Vol. 319, 01.06.2018, p. 142-155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fisher, Beth A. ; Aufdenkampe, Anthony K. ; Yoo, Kyungsoo ; Aalto, Rolf E. ; Marquard, Julia. / Soil carbon redistribution and organo-mineral associations after lateral soil movement and mixing in a first-order forest watershed. In: Geoderma. 2018 ; Vol. 319. pp. 142-155.
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