Socioeconomic status and health across the life course: A test of the social causation and health selection hypotheses

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

66 Scopus citations

Abstract

This research investigates the merits of the "social causation" and "health selection" explanations for associations between socioeconomic status and self-reported overall health, musculoskeletal health and depression. Using data that include information about individuals' SES and health from childhood through late adulthood, I employ structural equation models that account for errors in measured variables and that allow for explicit tests of various hypotheses about how SES and health are related. For each outcome and for both women and men the results provide no support for the health selection hypothesis. SES affects each health outcome at multiple points in the life course, but the reverse is not true.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2125-2154
Number of pages30
JournalSocial Forces
Volume87
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2009

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Socioeconomic status and health across the life course: A test of the social causation and health selection hypotheses'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this