Socio-environmental, personal and behavioural predictors of fast-food intake among adolescents

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47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To identify the socio-environmental, personal and behavioural factors that are longitudinally predictive of changes in adolescents fast-food intake.Design Population-based longitudinal cohort study.Setting Participants from Minnesota schools completed in-class assessments in 1999 (Time 1) while in middle school and mailed surveys in 2004 (Time 2) while in high school.Subjects A racially, ethnically and socio-economically diverse sample of adolescents (n 806).Results Availability of unhealthy food at home, being born in the USA and preferring the taste of unhealthy foods were predictive of higher fast-food intake after 5 years among both males and females. Among females, personal and behavioural factors, including concern about weight and use of healthy weight-control techniques, were protective against increased fast-food intake. Among males, socio-environmental factors, including maternal and friends concern for eating healthy food and maternal encouragement to eat healthy food, were predictive of lower fast-food intake. Sports team participation was a strong risk factor for increased fast-food intake among males.Conclusions Our findings suggest that addressing socio-environmental factors such as acculturation and home food availability may help reduce fast-food intake among adolescents. Additionally, gender-specific intervention strategies, including working with boys sports teams, family members and the peer group, and for girls, emphasizing the importance of healthy weight-maintenance strategies and the addition of flavourful and healthy food options to their diet, may help reduce fast-food intake.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1767-1774
Number of pages8
JournalPublic health nutrition
Volume12
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2009

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Fast Foods
Eating
Food
Weights and Measures
Sports
Mothers
Peer Group
Acculturation
Longitudinal Studies
Cohort Studies
Maintenance
Diet

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Dietary intake
  • Fast food

Cite this

Socio-environmental, personal and behavioural predictors of fast-food intake among adolescents. / Bauer, Katherine W.; Larson, Nicole I.; Nelson, Melissa C.; Story, Mary; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne.

In: Public health nutrition, Vol. 12, No. 10, 01.10.2009, p. 1767-1774.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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