Socio-Emotional Learning among Low-Income Prekindergarteners: The Roles of Individual Factors and Early Intervention

Christina F. Mondi, Arthur J. Reynolds

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Research Findings: Previous research has indicated that low-income children are at increased risk for socio-emotional problems, which may contribute to socioeconomic disparities in wellbeing and academic achievement. The present study examines socio-emotional learning (SEL) across the prekindergarten year in a low-income, racially and ethnically diverse sample of Chicago Public School students (N = 2,630). The sample included participants of the Child-Parent Center early educational intervention program (N = 1,724) and a propensity-score matched comparison group (N = 906). At the beginning of the prekindergarten year, teachers rated boys and lower income participants as having relatively lower SEL skills, and CPC participants and older children as having slightly higher SEL skills. Over time, CPC participants exhibited significantly greater rates of SEL growth, ending the prekindergarten year with teacher-rated SEL scores that were an average 10.30% higher than control participants. There were no significant differences in SEL growth over time by sex or family income. Practice and Policy: Multicomponent, school-based early intervention programs (e.g., CPC) have the potential to promote SEL among at-risk populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalEarly Education and Development
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

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