Social problem solving in hyperactive-aggressive children: how and what they think in conditions of automatic and controlled processing.

M. L. Bloomquist, G. J. August, C. Cohen, A. Doyle, K. Everhart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Examined how and what children think under conditions of automatic and controlled processing within the context of social problem solving. In a condition that elicited automatic processing, hyperactive-aggressive children did not differ in being able to identify the components of a problem or in the number of solutions generated to solve a problem, but were more aggressive in the types of solutions generated, as compared to nonhyperactive-nonaggressive children. Furthermore, in a condition eliciting controlled processing, hyperactive-aggressive children did not differ in identifying problem components, generating solutions, or in anticipating outcomes for solutions, but were less able to anticipate consequences, and were more aggressive in choosing a best solution to solve a problem, as compared to nonhyperactive-nonaggressive children. The study demonstrated a relation between problem-solving codes that discriminated between groups, and overall child adjustment. Implications for social problem-solving interventions are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)172-180
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of clinical child psychology
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1997

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