Snapshot Serengeti, high-frequency annotated camera trap images of 40 mammalian species in an African savanna

Alexandra Swanson, Margaret Kosmala, Chris Lintott, Robert Simpson, Arfon Smith, Craig Packer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

145 Scopus citations

Abstract

Camera traps can be used to address large-scale questions in community ecology by providing systematic data on an array of wide-ranging species. We deployed 225 camera traps across 1,125 km 2 in Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, to evaluate spatial and temporal inter-species dynamics. The cameras have operated continuously since 2010 and had accumulated 99,241 camera-trap days and produced 1.2 million sets of pictures by 2013. Members of the general public classified the images via the citizen-science website www.snapshotserengeti.org. Multiple users viewed each image and recorded the species, number of individuals, associated behaviours, and presence of young. Over 28,000 registered users contributed 10.8 million classifications. We applied a simple algorithm to aggregate these individual classifications into a final 'consensus' dataset, yielding a final classification for each image and a measure of agreement among individual answers. The consensus classifications and raw imagery provide an unparalleled opportunity to investigate multi-species dynamics in an intact ecosystem and a valuable resource for machine-learning and computer-vision research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number150026
JournalScientific Data
Volume2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 9 2015

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