Smoking behaviors and regular source of health care among African Americans

Jasjit S. Ahluwalia, Kulmeet S. Dang, Won S. Choi, Kari Jo Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives. The purpose of the study was to determine associations between having a regular source of health care, advice from a physician to quit smoking, and smoking-related behaviors among African American smokers. Methods. A secondary analysis was conducted on data obtained from an intervention study with a post-test assessment of the effectiveness of smoking status as a vital sign. The setting was an adult walk-in clinic at a large inner-city hospital and 879 African American adult current smokers were examined. Results. Among African American smokers, there was an association between having a regular source of health care and planning to quit smoking within the next 30 days (OR = 1.46; 95% CI: 1.04-2.05), receiving physician advice to quit (OR = 1.46; 95% CI: 1.02-2.10), and smoking ≤ 10 cigarettes a day (OR = 1.42; 95% CI: 1.00-2.03). Conclusions. African American current smokers with a regular source of health care were further along the quitting process than those without a regular source of health care. Our findings indicate a potential benefit of complementing programs that increase physician cessation advice rates with policies that increase rates of health insurance and the likelihood that individuals have a regular source of health care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number91004
Pages (from-to)393-396
Number of pages4
JournalPreventive medicine
Volume34
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

Keywords

  • Blacks
  • Primary health care
  • Smoking
  • Smoking cessation
  • Urban health

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