Small satellite attitude control for tracking resident space objects

Dylan Conway, Richard Linares, John L. Crassidis

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This paper addresses the attitude determination and control problem for the University at Buffalo's GLADOS mission. The main objective of the mission is to collect multi-band photometric data of resident space objects to improve space situational awareness. The team plans to use two optical payloads, a wide-field camera and a spectrometer, to achieve this goal. The attitude control system uses feedback from the wide-field camera in order to track targets and allow the collection of spectral data. The development of this novel approach which is suitable for low-cost small satellites is presented. A numerical simulation of a modeled mission including environmental disturbances, reaction wheel limitations, and sensor errors and delays is outlined. Results of this simulation are then presented. The ability of this approach to effectively track targets within the narrow field-of-view of the spectrometer is demonstrated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationGuidance and Control 2012 - Advances in the Astronautical Sciences
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of the 35th Annual AAS Rocky Mountain Section Guidance and Control Conference
Pages187-197
Number of pages11
StatePublished - 2012
Event35th Annual AAS Rocky Mountain Section Guidance and Control Conference - Breckenridge, CO, United States
Duration: Feb 3 2012Feb 8 2012

Publication series

NameAdvances in the Astronautical Sciences
Volume144
ISSN (Print)0065-3438

Other

Other35th Annual AAS Rocky Mountain Section Guidance and Control Conference
CountryUnited States
CityBreckenridge, CO
Period2/3/122/8/12

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