Small fishes crossed a large mountain range: Quaternary stream capture events and freshwater fishes on both sides of the Taebaek Mountains

Daemin Kim, M. Vincent Hirt, Yong Jin Won, Andrew M. Simons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The Taebaek Mountains in Korea serve as the most apparent biogeographic barrier for Korean freshwater fishes, resulting in 2 distinct ichthyofaunal assemblages on the eastern (East/Japan Sea slope) and western (Yellow Sea and Korea Strait slopes) sides of the mountain range. Of nearly 100 species of native primary freshwater fishes in Korea, only 18 species occur naturally on both sides of the mountain range. Interestingly, there are 5 rheophilic species (Phoxinus phoxinus, Coreoleuciscus splendidus, Ladislavia taczanowskii, Iksookimia koreensis and Koreocobitis rotundicaudata) found on both sides of the Taebaek Mountains that are geographically restricted to the Osip River (and several neighboring rivers, for L. taczanowskii and I. koreensis) on the eastern side of the mountain range. The Osip River and its neighboring rivers also shared a rheophilic freshwater fish, Liobagrus mediadiposalis, with the Nakdong River on the western side of the mountain range. We assessed historical biogeographic hypotheses on the presence of these rheophilic fishes, utilizing DNA sequence data from the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. Results of our divergence time estimation indicate that ichthyofaunal transfers into the Osip River (and several neighboring rivers in East Sea slope) have occurred from the Han (Yellow Sea slope) and Nakdong (Korea Strait slope) Rivers since the Late Pleistocene. The inferred divergence times for the ichthyofaunal transfer across the Taebaek Mountains were consistent with the timing of hypothesized multiple reactivations of the Osip River Fault (Late Pleistocene), suggesting that the Osip River Fault reactivations may have caused stream capture events, followed by ichthyofaunal transfer, not only between the Osip and Nakdong Rivers, but also between the Osip and Han Rivers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)292-302
Number of pages11
JournalIntegrative Zoology
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

Fingerprint

freshwater fish
mountains
rivers
fish
Korean Peninsula
rheophilic species
Yellow Sea
Phoxinus phoxinus
Sea of Japan
cytochrome b
indigenous species
Japan
nucleotide sequences

Keywords

  • Korean fishes
  • Osipcheon fault
  • biogeographic barrier
  • comparative phylogeography
  • divergence time

Cite this

Small fishes crossed a large mountain range : Quaternary stream capture events and freshwater fishes on both sides of the Taebaek Mountains. / Kim, Daemin; Hirt, M. Vincent; Won, Yong Jin; Simons, Andrew M.

In: Integrative Zoology, Vol. 12, No. 4, 01.07.2017, p. 292-302.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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