Slow wave changes in amygdala to visual, auditory, and social stimuli following lesions of the inferior temporal cortex in squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus)

Arthur S. Kling, Robert L. Lloyd, Kent M. Perryman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Radiotelemetry of slow wave activity of the amygdala was recorded under a variety of conditions. Power, and the percentage of power in the δ band, increased in response to stimulation. Recordings of monkey vocalizations and slides of ethologically relevant, natural objects produced a greater increase in power than did control stimuli. The responses to auditory stimuli increased when these stimuli were presented in an unrestrained, group setting, yet the responses to the vocalizations remained greater than those following control stimuli. Both the natural auditory and visual stimuli produced a reliable hierarchy with regard to the magnitude of response. Following lesions of inferior temporal cortex, these two hierarchies are disrupted, especially in the auditory domain. Further, these same stimuli, when presented after the lesion, produced a decrease, rather than an increase, in power. Nevertheless, the power recorded from the natural stimuli was still greater than that recorded from control stimuli in that the former produced less of a decrease in power, following the lesion, than did the latter. These data, in conjunction with a parallel report on evoked potentials in the amygdala, before and after cortical lesions, lead us to conclude that sensory information, particularly auditory, available to the amygdala, following the lesion, is substantially the same, and that it is the interpretation of this information, by the amygdala, which is altered by the cortical lesion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)54-72
Number of pages19
JournalBehavioral and Neural Biology
Volume47
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1987

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