Sjögren's syndrome

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is a progressive autoimmune rheumatic disorder.1-6 Its precise etiology is unknown, although several contributing factors have been identified. One theory is that the condition results from complications related to infection with the Epstein-Barr virus.4 Primary exposure to or reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus elicits expression of the human leukocyte antigen complex. This is recognized by T lymphocytes (CD 4+) resulting in the release of cytokines (tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-2, interferon-gamma, and others). A genetic marker specific for Sjögren's syndrome, HLA-DR4, has been identified.1,2 According to the World Health Organization, the prevalence of Sjögren 's syndrome is unknown.7 A recent epidemiologic study in Sweden estimated the prevalence in the adult population to be 2.7%.8 In the United States, 10 years ago, the number of patients with Sjögren's syndrome was thought to be fewer than 100,000.9 This number today is estimated to be more than 1 million.10 Sjögren's syndrome has been reported in nearly every major country of the world, and the geographic distribution of cases appears to be relatively uniform.11 Sjögren's syndrome typically affects women (90%) during the fourth or fifth decade of life.12 Isolated cases of Sjögren's syndrome in children have been reported.13.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)689-699
Number of pages11
JournalQuintessence International
Volume30
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 1 1999

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HLA-DR4 Antigen
HLA Antigens
Human Herpesvirus 4
Genetic Markers
Sweden
Interferon-gamma
Interleukin-2
Epidemiologic Studies
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Cytokines
T-Lymphocytes
Infection
Population

Cite this

Sjögren's syndrome. / Rhodus, Nelson L.

In: Quintessence International, Vol. 30, No. 10, 01.10.1999, p. 689-699.

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

Rhodus, NL 1999, 'Sjögren's syndrome', Quintessence International, vol. 30, no. 10, pp. 689-699.
Rhodus, Nelson L. / Sjögren's syndrome. In: Quintessence International. 1999 ; Vol. 30, No. 10. pp. 689-699.
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