Similarities between somatic cells overexpressing the mos oncogene and oocytes during meiotic interphase

K. Fukasawa, M. S. Murakami, D. G. Blair, Ryoko Kuriyama, T. Hunt, P. Fischinger, G. F. Vande Woude

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

The mos protooncogene encodes a serine/threonine kinase and is a key regulator of oocyte meiotic maturation. After acute infection of Swiss 3T3 cells with virus containing the v-mos oncogene, cells expressing high levels of v-Mos round up and detach from the monolayer (floating cells), while cells that remain attached express 10-fold lower levels of v-Mos and are transformed. The floating cells are growth arrested with their chromosomes partially condensed in the absence of histone H1 kinase activity, while mitogen-activated protein kinase activity is very high. Collectively, these properties are similar to properties observed in maturing oocytes between meiosis I and II. In v-mos-transformed cell populations, mitogen-activated protein kinase activity is also elevated, correlating with the degree of morphological transformation and the level of Mos expression. Moreover, phosphoprotein modifications specific for M are found in both the floating cells and in v-mos-transformed cells, regardless of their cell cycle stage. One explanation for both morphological transformation and the phenotypes of the floating cells is that Mos imposes a meiotic program on different stages of the somatic cell cycle. The extent of this meiotic phenotype is proportional to the level of v-Mos expression. These results suggest that both morphological transformation and the phenotypes of the floating cells induced by Mos in Swiss 3T3 cells are related to its normal activities during oocyte maturation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1093-1103
Number of pages11
JournalCell Growth and Differentiation
Volume5
Issue number10
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

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