Signs and symptoms in chronic heart failure: Relevance of clinical trial results to point of care-data from Val-HeFT

Maylene Wong, Lidia Staszewsky, Elisa Carretta, Simona Barlera, Roberto Latini, Yann Tong Chiang, Robert D. Glazer, Jay N. Cohn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Clinical trials emphasize mortality and morbidity endpoints. Aims: To bring relevance of trial results to point of care by examining the prognostic and therapeutic value of individual signs and symptoms (S&S). Methods: We analysed data from 5010 patients with stable chronic heart failure and left ventricular dysfunction who were participants in the Val-HeFT study. Individual S&S were stratified by severity. Treatment differences between valsartan and placebo were analysed by S&S strata at baseline and endpoint by logistical regression, and an overall S&S score by ANCOVA. Hazard ratios of S&S strata were calculated for mortality and heart failure hospitalisation. Prognostic contributions of S&S to other variables were determined by multivariate analysis. Results: At endpoint, there were significantly fewer valsartan and more placebo patients with severe symptoms. Over time, improvement in the S&S overall score was significantly more favourable for valsartan than placebo. S&S strata were significantly predictive of risk for hospitalisation and death. S&S were each independent and incremental predictors of mortality compared to other variables. Symptom strata separated out moderately symptomatic patients with a mortality rate which was intermediate between that for NYHA Class II and III. Conclusion: Risk stratification of individual S&S defined prognosis, identified patients with an intermediate mortality between Class II and III, and treatment benefits of valsartan over placebo.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)502-508
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Journal of Heart Failure
Volume8
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2006

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Valsartan
Point-of-Care Systems
Signs and Symptoms
Heart Failure
Clinical Trials
Placebos
Mortality
Hospitalization
Left Ventricular Dysfunction
Therapeutics
Multivariate Analysis
Morbidity

Keywords

  • Orthopnoea
  • Resting and paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnoea

Cite this

Signs and symptoms in chronic heart failure : Relevance of clinical trial results to point of care-data from Val-HeFT. / Wong, Maylene; Staszewsky, Lidia; Carretta, Elisa; Barlera, Simona; Latini, Roberto; Chiang, Yann Tong; Glazer, Robert D.; Cohn, Jay N.

In: European Journal of Heart Failure, Vol. 8, No. 5, 01.08.2006, p. 502-508.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wong, Maylene ; Staszewsky, Lidia ; Carretta, Elisa ; Barlera, Simona ; Latini, Roberto ; Chiang, Yann Tong ; Glazer, Robert D. ; Cohn, Jay N. / Signs and symptoms in chronic heart failure : Relevance of clinical trial results to point of care-data from Val-HeFT. In: European Journal of Heart Failure. 2006 ; Vol. 8, No. 5. pp. 502-508.
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