Signal transduction, ageing and disease

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Ageing is defined by the loss of functional reserve over time, leading to a decreased tissue homeostasis and increased age-related pathology. The accumulation of damage including DNA damage contributes to driving cell signaling pathways that, in turn, can drive different cell fates, including senescence and apoptosis, as well as mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation. In addition, the accumulation of cell autonomous damage with time also drives ageing through non-cell autonomous pathways by modulation of signaling pathways. Interestingly, genetic and pharmacologic analysis of factors able to modulate lifespan and healthspan in model organisms and even humans have identified several key signaling pathways including IGF-1, NF-κB, FOXO3, mTOR, Nrf-2 and sirtuins. This review will discuss the roles of several of these key signaling pathways, in particular NF-κB and Nrf2, in modulating ageing and age-related diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSubcellular Biochemistry
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages227-247
Number of pages21
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Publication series

NameSubcellular Biochemistry
Volume91
ISSN (Print)0306-0225

Fingerprint

Signal transduction
Signal Transduction
Aging of materials
Tissue homeostasis
Sirtuins
Cell signaling
Pathology
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I
DNA Damage
Statistical Factor Analysis
Homeostasis
Cells
Modulation
Apoptosis
Inflammation
DNA

Keywords

  • Age-related disease
  • Apoptosis
  • Inflammation
  • NF-κB Nrf2
  • Senescence
  • Signaling pathways
  • Sirtuins

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Review

Cite this

Zhang, L., Yousefzadeh, M. J., Suh, Y., Niedernhofer, L. J., & Robbins, P. D. (2019). Signal transduction, ageing and disease. In Subcellular Biochemistry (pp. 227-247). (Subcellular Biochemistry; Vol. 91). Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-3681-2_9

Signal transduction, ageing and disease. / Zhang, Lei; Yousefzadeh, Matthew J.; Suh, Yousin; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Robbins, Paul D.

Subcellular Biochemistry. Springer New York, 2019. p. 227-247 (Subcellular Biochemistry; Vol. 91).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Zhang, L, Yousefzadeh, MJ, Suh, Y, Niedernhofer, LJ & Robbins, PD 2019, Signal transduction, ageing and disease. in Subcellular Biochemistry. Subcellular Biochemistry, vol. 91, Springer New York, pp. 227-247. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-3681-2_9
Zhang L, Yousefzadeh MJ, Suh Y, Niedernhofer LJ, Robbins PD. Signal transduction, ageing and disease. In Subcellular Biochemistry. Springer New York. 2019. p. 227-247. (Subcellular Biochemistry). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-3681-2_9
Zhang, Lei ; Yousefzadeh, Matthew J. ; Suh, Yousin ; Niedernhofer, Laura J. ; Robbins, Paul D. / Signal transduction, ageing and disease. Subcellular Biochemistry. Springer New York, 2019. pp. 227-247 (Subcellular Biochemistry).
@inbook{ce402de87d304d618a463f2f1c82958d,
title = "Signal transduction, ageing and disease",
abstract = "Ageing is defined by the loss of functional reserve over time, leading to a decreased tissue homeostasis and increased age-related pathology. The accumulation of damage including DNA damage contributes to driving cell signaling pathways that, in turn, can drive different cell fates, including senescence and apoptosis, as well as mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation. In addition, the accumulation of cell autonomous damage with time also drives ageing through non-cell autonomous pathways by modulation of signaling pathways. Interestingly, genetic and pharmacologic analysis of factors able to modulate lifespan and healthspan in model organisms and even humans have identified several key signaling pathways including IGF-1, NF-κB, FOXO3, mTOR, Nrf-2 and sirtuins. This review will discuss the roles of several of these key signaling pathways, in particular NF-κB and Nrf2, in modulating ageing and age-related diseases.",
keywords = "Age-related disease, Apoptosis, Inflammation, NF-κB Nrf2, Senescence, Signaling pathways, Sirtuins",
author = "Lei Zhang and Yousefzadeh, {Matthew J.} and Yousin Suh and Niedernhofer, {Laura J.} and Robbins, {Paul D.}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/978-981-13-3681-2_9",
language = "English (US)",
series = "Subcellular Biochemistry",
publisher = "Springer New York",
pages = "227--247",
booktitle = "Subcellular Biochemistry",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Signal transduction, ageing and disease

AU - Zhang, Lei

AU - Yousefzadeh, Matthew J.

AU - Suh, Yousin

AU - Niedernhofer, Laura J.

AU - Robbins, Paul D.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Ageing is defined by the loss of functional reserve over time, leading to a decreased tissue homeostasis and increased age-related pathology. The accumulation of damage including DNA damage contributes to driving cell signaling pathways that, in turn, can drive different cell fates, including senescence and apoptosis, as well as mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation. In addition, the accumulation of cell autonomous damage with time also drives ageing through non-cell autonomous pathways by modulation of signaling pathways. Interestingly, genetic and pharmacologic analysis of factors able to modulate lifespan and healthspan in model organisms and even humans have identified several key signaling pathways including IGF-1, NF-κB, FOXO3, mTOR, Nrf-2 and sirtuins. This review will discuss the roles of several of these key signaling pathways, in particular NF-κB and Nrf2, in modulating ageing and age-related diseases.

AB - Ageing is defined by the loss of functional reserve over time, leading to a decreased tissue homeostasis and increased age-related pathology. The accumulation of damage including DNA damage contributes to driving cell signaling pathways that, in turn, can drive different cell fates, including senescence and apoptosis, as well as mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation. In addition, the accumulation of cell autonomous damage with time also drives ageing through non-cell autonomous pathways by modulation of signaling pathways. Interestingly, genetic and pharmacologic analysis of factors able to modulate lifespan and healthspan in model organisms and even humans have identified several key signaling pathways including IGF-1, NF-κB, FOXO3, mTOR, Nrf-2 and sirtuins. This review will discuss the roles of several of these key signaling pathways, in particular NF-κB and Nrf2, in modulating ageing and age-related diseases.

KW - Age-related disease

KW - Apoptosis

KW - Inflammation

KW - NF-κB Nrf2

KW - Senescence

KW - Signaling pathways

KW - Sirtuins

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85063268221&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85063268221&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/978-981-13-3681-2_9

DO - 10.1007/978-981-13-3681-2_9

M3 - Chapter

C2 - 30888655

AN - SCOPUS:85063268221

T3 - Subcellular Biochemistry

SP - 227

EP - 247

BT - Subcellular Biochemistry

PB - Springer New York

ER -