Short report: Sexually transmitted infections in newly arrived refugees: Is routine screening for Neisseria gonorrheae and Chlamydia trachomatis infection indicated?

William M. Stauffer, John Painter, Blain Mamo, Robyn Kaiser, Michelle Weinberg, Stuart Berman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

More than 340 million cases of bacterial and protozoal sexually transmitted infections (STIs) occur annually. Approximately 70,000 refugees arrive in the United States on a yearly basis. Refugees are a particularly disenfranchised and vulnerable population. The prevalence of Chlamydia and gonorrhea in refugee populations has not been described, and the utility of routine screening is unknown. We performed a descriptive evaluation of 25,779 refugees who completed a screening medical examination in Minnesota during 2003-2010. A total of 18,516 (72%) refugees were tested for at least one STI: 183 (1.1%) of 17,235 were seropositive for syphilis, 15 (0.6%) of 2,512 were positive for Chlamydia, 5 (0.2%) of 2,403 were positive for gonorrhea, 136 (2.0%) of 6,765 were positive for human immunodeficiency virus, and 6 (0.1%) of 5,873 were positive for multiple STIs. Overall prevalence of Chlamydia (0.6%) and gonorrhea (0.2%) infection was low, which indicated that routine screening may not be indicated. However, further research on this subject is encouraged.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)292-295
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume86
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2012

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