Sharing information with children conceived using in vitro fertilisation

the effect of parents’ privacy orientation

M. A. Rueter, J. J. Connor, L. Pasch, K. N. Anderson, J. E. Scheib, A. F. Koerner, M. Damario

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine the moderating effect of parents’ approach to sharing information with children on the outcomes of information-sharing about in vitro fertilisation (IVF) conception. Background: Mental health professionals encourage parents to share information about IVF conception with their children, but limited research is available on associations among information-sharing, parent–child relationship quality and child adjustment. Predictions based on Communication Privacy Management Theory suggest that how parents share private information with children will moderate the association between sharing information about a child’s IVF conception and parent–child relationship quality and indirectly affect child adjustment. Method: Study hypotheses were tested using a sample of 175 families with 246 6- to 12-year-old children conceived using IVF. Path models hypothesised associations among information-sharing, parent privacy orientation, parent–child relationship satisfaction and child behavioural and emotional adjustment. Results: The results supported the proposed process. Among parents with an ‘open’ privacy orientation, IVF information-sharing with children positively related to parent–child relationship quality (r =.19, p =.03). This association was negative when parents had a ‘restricted’ privacy orientation (r = –.34, p =.01). In turn, relationship quality affected child adjustment. Conclusion: Children conceived using IVF report wanting to know about their conception method and infertility counsellors often recommend information-sharing. These findings support the need to better understand IVF information-sharing processes, and parents who favour a ‘restricted’ privacy orientation may require additional support to promote open communication with children about their IVF conception.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)90-102
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology
Volume34
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

Information Dissemination
Privacy
Fertilization in Vitro
Parents
Social Adjustment
Communication
Infertility
Mental Health

Keywords

  • Assisted reproduction
  • infertility
  • psychosocial factors
  • social interaction

Cite this

Sharing information with children conceived using in vitro fertilisation : the effect of parents’ privacy orientation. / Rueter, M. A.; Connor, J. J.; Pasch, L.; Anderson, K. N.; Scheib, J. E.; Koerner, A. F.; Damario, M.

In: Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology, Vol. 34, No. 1, 01.01.2016, p. 90-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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