Sharing information with children conceived using in vitro fertilisation: the effect of parents’ privacy orientation

M. A. Rueter, J. J. Connor, L. Pasch, K. N. Anderson, J. E. Scheib, A. F. Koerner, M. Damario

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To examine the moderating effect of parents’ approach to sharing information with children on the outcomes of information-sharing about in vitro fertilisation (IVF) conception. Background: Mental health professionals encourage parents to share information about IVF conception with their children, but limited research is available on associations among information-sharing, parent–child relationship quality and child adjustment. Predictions based on Communication Privacy Management Theory suggest that how parents share private information with children will moderate the association between sharing information about a child’s IVF conception and parent–child relationship quality and indirectly affect child adjustment. Method: Study hypotheses were tested using a sample of 175 families with 246 6- to 12-year-old children conceived using IVF. Path models hypothesised associations among information-sharing, parent privacy orientation, parent–child relationship satisfaction and child behavioural and emotional adjustment. Results: The results supported the proposed process. Among parents with an ‘open’ privacy orientation, IVF information-sharing with children positively related to parent–child relationship quality (r = .19, p = .03). This association was negative when parents had a ‘restricted’ privacy orientation (r = –.34, p = .01). In turn, relationship quality affected child adjustment. Conclusion: Children conceived using IVF report wanting to know about their conception method and infertility counsellors often recommend information-sharing. These findings support the need to better understand IVF information-sharing processes, and parents who favour a ‘restricted’ privacy orientation may require additional support to promote open communication with children about their IVF conception.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Sep 3 2015

Fingerprint

Information Dissemination
Privacy
Fertilization in Vitro
Parent-Child Relations
Social Adjustment
Communication
Infertility
Counseling
Mental Health

Keywords

  • Assisted reproduction
  • infertility
  • psychosocial factors
  • social interaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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Sharing information with children conceived using in vitro fertilisation : the effect of parents’ privacy orientation. / Rueter, M. A.; Connor, J. J.; Pasch, L.; Anderson, K. N.; Scheib, J. E.; Koerner, A. F.; Damario, M.

In: Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology, 03.09.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rueter, M. A.; Connor, J. J.; Pasch, L.; Anderson, K. N.; Scheib, J. E.; Koerner, A. F.; Damario, M. / Sharing information with children conceived using in vitro fertilisation : the effect of parents’ privacy orientation.

In: Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology, 03.09.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: To examine the moderating effect of parents’ approach to sharing information with children on the outcomes of information-sharing about in vitro fertilisation (IVF) conception. Background: Mental health professionals encourage parents to share information about IVF conception with their children, but limited research is available on associations among information-sharing, parent–child relationship quality and child adjustment. Predictions based on Communication Privacy Management Theory suggest that how parents share private information with children will moderate the association between sharing information about a child’s IVF conception and parent–child relationship quality and indirectly affect child adjustment. Method: Study hypotheses were tested using a sample of 175 families with 246 6- to 12-year-old children conceived using IVF. Path models hypothesised associations among information-sharing, parent privacy orientation, parent–child relationship satisfaction and child behavioural and emotional adjustment. Results: The results supported the proposed process. Among parents with an ‘open’ privacy orientation, IVF information-sharing with children positively related to parent–child relationship quality (r = .19, p = .03). This association was negative when parents had a ‘restricted’ privacy orientation (r = –.34, p = .01). In turn, relationship quality affected child adjustment. Conclusion: Children conceived using IVF report wanting to know about their conception method and infertility counsellors often recommend information-sharing. These findings support the need to better understand IVF information-sharing processes, and parents who favour a ‘restricted’ privacy orientation may require additional support to promote open communication with children about their IVF conception.",
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