Sexual Orientation, Religious Coping, and Drug Use in a Sample of HIV-Infected African-American Men Living in the Southern USA

Linda M. Skalski, Bianca Martin, Christina S. Meade

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Religiosity and spirituality are associated with reduced drug use in the general population, but it is unclear whether this relationship generalizes to sexual minorities. This study investigated the relationship between religious coping, drug use, and sexual orientation in a sample of HIV-infected African-American men (40 heterosexuals; 64 sexual minorities). Most participants (76%) reported being “moderately” or “very” religious. We found no main effect of religious coping or sexual orientation on frequency of drug use. However, there was an interaction between positive religious coping and sexual orientation. Among heterosexuals, positive religious coping was inversely associated with frequency of drug use. However, this relationship was not significant among sexual minorities. Findings suggest HIV-infected African-American sexual minorities living in the South may need additional coping resources to decrease vulnerability to drug use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1368-1381
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Religion and Health
Volume58
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 15 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported by National Institute on Drug Abuse Grants F31-DA035131 (Skalski) and K23-DA028660 (Meade).

Keywords

  • African-Americans
  • Drug use
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Religious coping
  • Sexual orientation

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