Sexual Orientation, Gender, and Gender Identity Microaggressions: Toward an Intersectional Framework for Social Work Research

Paul R. Sterzing, Rachel E. Gartner, Michael R. Woodford, Colleen Fisher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Professional ethics compel social workers to address all forms of discrimination and oppression. Microaggressions can contribute to health disparities for marginalized groups; yet, little is known about the frequency, mechanisms, and impact of microaggressions on sexual minorities, cisgender women, and gender minorities—particularly for those with intersecting marginalized identities. This article extends microaggression literature by exploring interrelated constructs of sexual orientation, gender, and gender identity microaggressions, and offering recommendations for future research using an intersectional lens to foster an integrated and complex understanding of microaggressions. Implications of an intersectional microaggression framework for social work education and practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)81-94
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Ethnic and Cultural Diversity in Social Work
Volume26
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2017

Keywords

  • GLBT
  • Microagressions
  • gender
  • intersectional theory
  • minority stress theory

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