Sex-specific alterations in preterm brain

Amanda Benavides, Andrew Metzger, Alexander Tereshchenko, Amy Conrad, Edward F. Bell, John Spencer, Shannon Ross-Sheehy, Michael K Georgieff, Vince Magnotta, Peg Nopoulos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: The literature on brain imaging in premature infants is mostly made up of studies that evaluate neonates, yet the most dynamic time of brain development happens from birth to 1 year of age. This study was designed to obtain quantitative brain measures from magnetic resonance imaging scans of infants born prematurely at 12 months of age. Methods: The subject group was designed to capture a wide range of gestational age (GA) from premature to full-term infants. An age-specific atlas generated quantitative brain measures. A regression model was used to predict effects of GA and sex on brain measures. Results: There was a primary effect of sex on: (1) intracranial volume, males > females; (2) proportional cerebral cortical gray matter (females > males), and (3) cerebral white matter (males > females). GA predicted cerebral volume and cerebral spinal fluid. GA also predicted cortical gray matter in a sex-specific manner with GA having a significant effect on cortical volume in the males, but not in females. Conclusions and relevance: Sex differences in brain structure are large early in life. GA had sex-specific effects highlighting the importance evaluating sex effects in neurodevelopmental outcomes of premature infants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-62
Number of pages8
JournalPediatric Research
Volume85
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Gestational Age
Brain
Premature Infants
Atlases
Neuroimaging
Sex Characteristics
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Parturition
Newborn Infant
Gray Matter

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Cite this

Benavides, A., Metzger, A., Tereshchenko, A., Conrad, A., Bell, E. F., Spencer, J., ... Nopoulos, P. (2019). Sex-specific alterations in preterm brain. Pediatric Research, 85(1), 55-62. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41390-018-0187-5

Sex-specific alterations in preterm brain. / Benavides, Amanda; Metzger, Andrew; Tereshchenko, Alexander; Conrad, Amy; Bell, Edward F.; Spencer, John; Ross-Sheehy, Shannon; Georgieff, Michael K; Magnotta, Vince; Nopoulos, Peg.

In: Pediatric Research, Vol. 85, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 55-62.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Benavides, A, Metzger, A, Tereshchenko, A, Conrad, A, Bell, EF, Spencer, J, Ross-Sheehy, S, Georgieff, MK, Magnotta, V & Nopoulos, P 2019, 'Sex-specific alterations in preterm brain', Pediatric Research, vol. 85, no. 1, pp. 55-62. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41390-018-0187-5
Benavides A, Metzger A, Tereshchenko A, Conrad A, Bell EF, Spencer J et al. Sex-specific alterations in preterm brain. Pediatric Research. 2019 Jan 1;85(1):55-62. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41390-018-0187-5
Benavides, Amanda ; Metzger, Andrew ; Tereshchenko, Alexander ; Conrad, Amy ; Bell, Edward F. ; Spencer, John ; Ross-Sheehy, Shannon ; Georgieff, Michael K ; Magnotta, Vince ; Nopoulos, Peg. / Sex-specific alterations in preterm brain. In: Pediatric Research. 2019 ; Vol. 85, No. 1. pp. 55-62.
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