Seroprevalence of HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection among children diagnosed with protein-calorie malnutrition in Nigeria

G. D. Fischer, C. R. Rinaldo, D. Gbadero, L. A. Kingsley, O. Ndimbie, C. Howard, P. C. Montemayor, A. Langer, W. Sibolboro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Excessive weight loss due to protein calorie malnutrition (PCM) is a significant problem in Nigerian children. This syndrome may be difficult to differentiate from the wasting disease caused by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. We studied 70 children admitted to the Baptist Medical Center in Ogbomosho, Nigeria in 1990 with PCM for prevalence of antibodies to HIV-1 and HIV-2. The cohort was from low-risk mothers and had a median age of 25 months (range, 4 months–9 years) with a weight deficit of at least 20% of the theoretical weight for age. Two sera were positive for anti-HIV-1 by both ELISA and Western blot (WB). A high prevalence of samples negative for HIV-1 antibody by ELISA were repeatedly reactive (11%, 8/70) or indeterminate (46%. 32/70) by WB. None of the sera was positive for antibody to HIV-2. There was no correlation of ELISA positivity or extent of WB banding with successful recovery from malnutrition. These results indicate a relatively low but significant prevalence of HIV-1 infection in Nigerian children with PCM. The high prevalence of indeterminate reactions in WB assays for HIV-1 suggests that other procedures may be necessary for confirmatory diagnosis of HIY-1 infection in this African population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)373-378
Number of pages6
JournalEpidemiology and infection
Volume110
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

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Protein-Energy Malnutrition
HIV-2
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Nigeria
HIV Infections
HIV-1
Western Blotting
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Virus Diseases
Antibodies
Wasting Syndrome
Weights and Measures
Serum
Malnutrition
Weight Loss
Mothers
Infection
Population

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Seroprevalence of HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection among children diagnosed with protein-calorie malnutrition in Nigeria. / Fischer, G. D.; Rinaldo, C. R.; Gbadero, D.; Kingsley, L. A.; Ndimbie, O.; Howard, C.; Montemayor, P. C.; Langer, A.; Sibolboro, W.

In: Epidemiology and infection, Vol. 110, No. 2, 01.01.1993, p. 373-378.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fischer, GD, Rinaldo, CR, Gbadero, D, Kingsley, LA, Ndimbie, O, Howard, C, Montemayor, PC, Langer, A & Sibolboro, W 1993, 'Seroprevalence of HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection among children diagnosed with protein-calorie malnutrition in Nigeria', Epidemiology and infection, vol. 110, no. 2, pp. 373-378. https://doi.org/10.1017/S095026880006831X
Fischer, G. D. ; Rinaldo, C. R. ; Gbadero, D. ; Kingsley, L. A. ; Ndimbie, O. ; Howard, C. ; Montemayor, P. C. ; Langer, A. ; Sibolboro, W. / Seroprevalence of HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection among children diagnosed with protein-calorie malnutrition in Nigeria. In: Epidemiology and infection. 1993 ; Vol. 110, No. 2. pp. 373-378.
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