Seroprevalence and Determinants of Helicobacter pylori Infection in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos

Sabrina H. Tsang, M. Larissa Avilés-Santa, Christian C. Abnet, Maximo O. Brito, Martha L. Daviglus, Sylvia Wassertheil-Smoller, Sheila F. Castañeda, Sharon Minnerath, Gregory A. Talavera, Barry I. Graubard, Bharat Thyagarajan, M. Constanza Camargo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background & Aims: Helicobacter pylori infection is the primary known risk factor for gastric cancer. Despite the global decline in H. pylori prevalence, this infection remains a major public health concern in developing areas, including Latin America. Our study aimed to determine H. pylori seroprevalence and identified its determinants among Hispanics/Latinos living in the United States (U.S.). Methods: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) is a population-based sample of self-identified Hispanics/Latinos (n = 16,144) in four U.S. communities, aged 18 to 74 years, recruited from randomly selected households using a stratified two-stage area probability sample design based on sampling households within sampled census block groups weighted for differential response rates. Anti-H. pylori immunoglobulin G antibodies were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using plasma samples. We calculated adjusted seroprevalence (i.e., predicted margins) from multivariable logistic regression models. Results: The overall weighted H. pylori seroprevalence was 57% among HCHS/SOL participants, with 38% and 62% seropositivity among U.S.-born and non-U.S.-born individuals, respectively. Age-adjusted prevalence varied by self-reported Hispanic/Latino background, ranging from 47% in Puerto Rican to 72% in Central American backgrounds. Adjusted H. pylori seroprevalence was higher in the following groups: older age, male sex, lower education, non-U.S. born status, smoking, greater number of missing teeth, fewer doctor visits, lower ferritin level, and hepatitis A seropositivity. Conclusions: H. pylori seroprevalence in Hispanics/Latinos remains high and differed significantly by Hispanic/Latino background. H. pylori seropositivity is strongly associated with poor socioeconomic conditions. These findings highlight the ongoing importance of this bacterial infection in the U.S.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e438-e451
JournalClinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Volume20
Issue number3
Early online dateMar 2 2021
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Funding The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos was carried out as a collaborative study supported by contracts from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) to the University of North Carolina (N01-HC65233), University of Miami (N01-HC65234), Albert Einstein College of Medicine (N01-HC65235), Northwestern University (N01-HC65236), and San Diego State University (N01-HC65237). The following Institutes/Centers/Offices contribute to the HCHS/SOL through a transfer of funds to the NHLBI: National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities, the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communications Disorders, the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and the Office of Dietary Supplements. This study was also funded in part by the Intramural Research Program of the National Cancer Institute. The views expressed in this manuscript are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official views of the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, the National Institutes of Health, or the U.S. federal government.

Funding Information:
Funding The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos was carried out as a collaborative study supported by contracts from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) to the University of North Carolina (N01-HC65233), University of Miami (N01-HC65234), Albert Einstein College of Medicine (N01-HC65235), Northwestern University (N01-HC65236), and San Diego State University (N01-HC65237). The following Institutes/Centers/Offices contribute to the HCHS/SOL through a transfer of funds to the NHLBI: National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities , the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communications Disorders, the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research , the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases , the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke , and the Office of Dietary Supplements . This study was also funded in part by the Intramural Research Program of the National Cancer Institute . The views expressed in this manuscript are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official views of the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, the National Institutes of Health, or the U.S. federal government.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 AGA Institute

Keywords

  • Determinants
  • HCHS/SOL
  • Helicobacter pylori
  • Hispanics/Latinos
  • Seroprevalence

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